These distinctive illustrations represent the imagery of our history. Avi Katz created the designs to be part of the Ancient Ties Chai Style Collection. These exquisite images chronicle our roots by recounting the stories of the Bible.

Traditions are formed not only by practices shaped by text and images, but also through oral expression. These distinctive illustrations represent the imagery of our history. Avi Katz created the designs to be part of the Ancient Ties Chai Style Collection. These exquisite images chronicle our roots by recounting the stories of the Bible.

These distinctive illustrations represent the imagery of our history. Avi Katz created the designs to be part of the Ancient Ties Chai Style Collection. These exquisite images chronicle our roots by recounting the stories of the Bible.

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B’reishit (Genesis) The Garden of Eden

Adam and Eve, and the snake with an utopian Garden of Eden

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Traditions are formed not only by practices shaped by text and images, but also through oral expression. These distinctive illustrations represent the imagery of our history. Avi Katz created the designs to be part of the Ancient Ties Chai Style Collection. These exquisite images chronicle our roots by recounting the stories of the Bible.

Price: $24.00

Chayei Sara An important meeting at the well

In ancient days the well was a common meeting place. Eliezer, the servant of Abraham begins to learn of the fine qualities of Rebecca.

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Traditions are formed not only by practices shaped by text and images, but also through oral expression. These distinctive illustrations represent the imagery of our history. Avi Katz created the designs to be part of the Ancient Ties Chai Style Collection. These exquisite images chronicle our roots by recounting the stories of the Bible.

Price: $24.00

Citadel of David Silk Tie

“Also he (King Hezekia) strengthened himself, and built up all the wall that was broken, and raised it up to the towers and repaired Millo in the city of David and made darts and shields in abundance” (Chronicles II 32:5)

The tie features a scene depicting the tower from a westerly view. The scene below the tower is of a grove of olive trees of some which are hundreds of years old. This impressionistic illustration helps portray the tower as a Jerusalem Icon through time. The Tower of David dominates the old city from its highest point.

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Since the second century BCE the fortress has guarded Jerusalem vulnerable northern and western approaches. Each successive ruler of the city, aware of the site’s importance, buttressed and rebuilt it, endeavoring to out do his predecessors The victory of Judah the Macabee over the successors of Alexander the Great marked the start of the Hasmonean dynasty in the second century BCE. It was a period of prosperity, reflected in large-scale construction in Jerusalem, the Kingdoms capital. The earliest structures built of impressive hewn stone, are the remnants of a wall and two towers, which probably define the city’s western limits in the Hasmonean period. On the ground of the Citadel were hundreds of arrowheads along with catapult and sling stones perhaps from the siege laid on the city in 132 CE by Antiochus IV. No one built Jerusalem more grandly than King Herod, about 150 years later. The majesty of the Western Wall is evidence of his prowess as a builder of monumental structures. His major contribution to the city’s fortifications consisted of the three magnificent towers of the Citadel, named after his brother, good friend and his wife: Phasael, Hippicus and Miriam. When Rome gave way to Byzantium, Jerusalem became a magnet for Christian pilgrims. In this period the Citadel was probably not used exclusively for military purposes; small enclosures with rough mosaic floors suggest monks, quarters. But the Byzantines, too, reinforced the Citadels walls, using the ancient stones dislodged in previous battles. In 638 CE the Arabs overran the city, ruling for the next 460 years. They built a smaller Citadel with a rounded tower, the ruins of which are still visible in the southern part of the inner courtyard.

Price: $36.00

King Tutankhamun Cartouche – Woven Silk Tie Blue

This design is taken from the Golden Bands that were around King Tut Mummy. The bands were made of beaten gold plaques which were inscribed with religious texts. The cartouche reads: Tutankhamun, Ruler of Heliopolis tut-ankh-amun heka iunu. The top three signs: the feather, the block sign with the extending lines, and the wavy line make up the word Amun.

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The next group, from left to right are the sign meaning life, ankh, the two small half circles are phonetic signs pronounced "t" and the bird sounds like w or u. The crook sign means ruler. The other two signs on the bottom row of the cartouche mean Heliopolis shema, or Southern Heliopolis, by which is meant Thebes, the southern capital of Egypt. Egypt is our window to humanity's distant past and in understanding its history, we find mankind's greatest glories and achievements, as well as his often repeated mistakes. We may follow along with the building of empires, only to see them collapse again and again. We find great men and rulers of renowned, but we often also see their ultimate demise. We learn about religion, its evolution and, as the world grows older, its replacement with newer religions. Yet, the ancient Egyptian religion has never really completely died out. Even today, many Egyptians continue customs, including some aspects of religion, held over from thousands of years ago. In fact, throughout the world, aspects of the ancient Egyptian religion, particularly funerary, continue to make an impact on our modern lives. The designs of the neckwear are based on elements found on the coffins of king Tutankhamen. There is probably no more famous group of artifacts in the world then those associated with the discovery of young King Tutankhamen's tomb. Tutankhamen died as young as 16 or 17 years of age. He was probably a son of King Akhenaton by one of his secondary wives. His wife Ankhesenamun was daughter of Akhenaton and Nefertiti. Tutankhamen came to the throne as a young child and ruled for about nine years under the regency of Vizier Ay and the strong influence of the army commander Horemheb. The main events of his reign were to move the capital of Egypt back from El-Amarna to Memphis and to begin the transition from the monotheistic cult of Aton created by Akhenaton back to the polytheistic religion of Egypt with Amun-Ra again as the main God.

Price: $36.00

King Tutankhamun Cartouche – Woven Silk Tie Brown

This design is taken from the Golden Bands that were around King Tut Mummy. The bands were made of beaten gold plaques which were inscribed with religious texts. The cartouche reads: Tutankhamun, Ruler of Heliopolis tut-ankh-amun heka iunu. The top three signs: the feather, the block sign with the extending lines, and the wavy line make up the word Amun.

| READ MORE |
Additional DescriptionMore Details

The next group, from left to right are the sign meaning life, ankh, the two small half circles are phonetic signs pronounced "t" and the bird sounds like w or u. The crook sign means ruler. The other two signs on the bottom row of the cartouche mean Heliopolis shema, or Southern Heliopolis, by which is meant Thebes, the southern capital of Egypt. Egypt is our window to humanity's distant past and in understanding its history, we find mankind's greatest glories and achievements, as well as his often repeated mistakes. We may follow along with the building of empires, only to see them collapse again and again. We find great men and rulers of renowned, but we often also see their ultimate demise. We learn about religion, its evolution and, as the world grows older, its replacement with newer religions. Yet, the ancient Egyptian religion has never really completely died out. Even today, many Egyptians continue customs, including some aspects of religion, held over from thousands of years ago. In fact, throughout the world, aspects of the ancient Egyptian religion, particularly funerary, continue to make an impact on our modern lives. The designs of the neckwear are based on elements found on the coffins of king Tutankhamen. There is probably no more famous group of artifacts in the world then those associated with the discovery of young King Tutankhamen's tomb. Tutankhamen died as young as 16 or 17 years of age. He was probably a son of King Akhenaton by one of his secondary wives. His wife Ankhesenamun was daughter of Akhenaton and Nefertiti. Tutankhamen came to the throne as a young child and ruled for about nine years under the regency of Vizier Ay and the strong influence of the army commander Horemheb. The main events of his reign were to move the capital of Egypt back from El-Amarna to Memphis and to begin the transition from the monotheistic cult of Aton created by Akhenaton back to the polytheistic religion of Egypt with Amun-Ra again as the main God.

Price: $36.00

King Tutankhamun Cartouche – Silk Tie

This design is taken from the Golden Bands that were around King Tut Mummy. The bands were made of beaten gold plaques which were inscribed with religious texts. The cartouche reads: Tutankhamon, Ruler of Heliopolis tut-ankh-amun heka iunu. The top three signs: the feather, the block sign with the extending lines, and the wavy line make up the word Amun.

 

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Additional DescriptionMore Details

The next group, from left to right are the sign meaning life, ankh, the two small half circles are phonetic signs pronounced "t" and the bird sounds like w or u. The crook sign means ruler. The other two signs on the bottom row of the cartouche mean Heliopolis shema, or Southern Heliopolis, by which is meant Thebes, the southern capital of Egypt. Egypt is our window to humanity's distant past and in understanding its history, we find mankind's greatest glories and achievements, as well as his often repeated mistakes. We may follow along with the building of empires, only to see them collapse again and again. We find great men and rulers of renowned, but we often also see their ultimate demise. We learn about religion, its evolution and, as the world grows older, its replacement with newer religions. Yet, the ancient Egyptian religion has never really completely died out. Even today, many Egyptians continue customs, including some aspects of religion, held over from thousands of years ago. In fact, throughout the world, aspects of the ancient Egyptian religion, particularly funerary, continue to make an impact on our modern lives. The designs of the neckwear are based on elements found on the coffins of king Tutankhamen. There is probably no more famous group of artifacts in the world then those associated with the discovery of young King Tutankhamen's tomb. Tutankhamen died as young as 16 or 17 years of age. He was probably a son of King Akhenaton by one of his secondary wives. His wife Ankhesenamun was daughter of Akhenaton and Nefertiti. Tutankhamen came to the throne as a young child and ruled for about nine years under the regency of Vizier Ay and the strong influence of the army commander Horemheb. The main events of his reign were to move the capital of Egypt back from El-Amarna to Memphis and to begin the transition from the monotheistic cult of Aton created by Akhenaton back to the polytheistic religion of Egypt with Amun-Ra again as the main God.

Price: $36.00

King Tutankhamun Falcon Feather and Golden Band Scarf

Scarves are no longer simply a square or long narrow strip of material worn for warmth round the neck or tied round the head. Covering the head had religious connotations among the Hindus, Jews, Christians, Parsis and Muslims. For many years Indian sari-pallav or the dupatta or odhani has served this purpose.

 

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But scarves have left behind the peasant-inspired look and have crashed onto the beaches, in colleges, evening out, day-time casual wear and the fashion magazines. They are in vogue and, along with bags, shoes, belts and jewelry, have become the accessories of the moment. Our designs have a blend of contemporary elements with the feel of the ancient designs relating untold tales. This design is taken from the Golden Bands that were around King Tut Mummy. The bands were made of beaten gold plaques which were inscribed with religious texts. The cartouche reads: Tutankhamon, Ruler of Heliopolis tut-ankh-amun heka iunu. Under the kings hands on the coffin the goddesses Nekhbet and Wadjet, spread their wings protectively around the upper part of the royal body. Each of them grasp in their talons the hieroglyphic sign for "infinity”. Under the kings hands on the coffin the goddesses Nekhbet and Wadjet, spread their wings protectively around the upper part of the royal body. Osiris were routinely added to the decoration of the coffin walls in order to provide a ring of protection around the king. Egypt is our window to humanity's distant past and in understanding its history, we find mankind's greatest glories and achievements, as well as his often repeated mistakes. We may follow along with the building of empires, only to see them collapse again and again. We find great men and rulers of renowned, but we often also see their ultimate demise. We learn about religion, its evolution and, as the world grows older, its replacement with newer religions. Yet, the ancient Egyptian religion has never really completely died out. Even today, many Egyptians continue customs, including some aspects of religion, held over from thousands of years ago. In fact, throughout the world, aspects of the ancient Egyptian religion, particularly funerary, continue to make an impact on our modern lives. The designs of the neckwear are based on elements found on the coffins of king Tutankhamen. There is probably no more famous group of artifacts in the world then those associated with the discovery of young King Tutankhamen's tomb. Tutankhamen died as young as 16 or 17 years of age. He was probably a son of King Akhenaton by one of his secondary wives. His wife Ankhesenamun was daughter of Akhenaton and Nefertiti. Tutankhamen came to the throne as a young child and ruled for about nine years under the regency of Vizier Ay and the strong influence of the army commander Horemheb. The main events of his reign were to move the capital of Egypt back from El-Amarna to Memphis and to begin the transition from the monotheistic cult of Aton created by Akhenaton back to the polytheistic religion of Egypt with Amun-Ra again as the main God.

Price: $45.00

King Tutankhamun Protecting Wings – Silk Tie

This design is taken from the coffins of King Tut. Under the kings hands on the coffin the goddesses Nekhbet and Wadjet, spread their wings protectively around the upper part of the royal body. Each of them grasp in their talons the hieroglyphic sign for "infinity”.

In addition the figures of the goddesses Isis and Nephthys, the four sons of Horus and other deities connected with Osiris were routinely added to the decoration of the coffin walls in order to provide a ring of protection around the king.

 

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Egypt is our window to humanity's distant past and in understanding its history, we find mankind's greatest glories and achievements, as well as his often repeated mistakes. We may follow along with the building of empires, only to see them collapse again and again. We find great men and rulers of renowned, but we often also see their ultimate demise. We learn about religion, its evolution and, as the world grows older, its replacement with newer religions. Yet, the ancient Egyptian religion has never really completely died out. Even today, many Egyptians continue customs, including some aspects of religion, held over from thousands of years ago. In fact, throughout the world, aspects of the ancient Egyptian religion, particularly funerary, continue to make an impact on our modern lives. The designs of the neckwear are based on elements found on the coffins of king Tutankhamen. There is probably no more famous group of artifacts in the world then those associated with the discovery of young King Tutankhamen's tomb. Tutankhamen died as young as 16 or 17 years of age. He was probably a son of King Akhenaton by one of his secondary wives. His wife Ankhesenamun was daughter of Akhenaton and Nefertiti. Tutankhamen came to the throne as a young child and ruled for about nine years under the regency of Vizier Ay and the strong influence of the army commander Horemheb. The main events of his reign were to move the capital of Egypt back from El-Amarna to Memphis and to begin the transition from the monotheistic cult of Aton created by Akhenaton back to the polytheistic religion of Egypt with Amun-Ra again as the main God.

Price: $36.00

Lekh L’kha The Journey begins

“The Lord said to Avram: go forth from your land, your birthplace and your family, to the land that I will show you.  I will make you a great nation, and I will bless you and magnify your name, and you shall be a source of blessing.  I will bless those that bless you and curse the one who curses you, and all of the nations of the world shall be blessed on your account" (Genesis 12:1-3)

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The Journey of Abram, Sarai, and Lot begins. God told Abram to leave his native land and his father's house for a land that God would show him, promising to make of him a great nation, bless him, make his name great, bless those who blessed him, and curse those who cursed him. (Genesis 12:1-3) Following God's command, Abram took his wife Sarai, his nephew Lot, and the wealth they had acquired in Haran, and traveled to the Canaan. (Genesis 12:4-6) In the Midrash (stories that explain the Bible) it is said that when Abram was young, he realized that idol worship was foolish. To make his point, one day, when Abram was asked to watch the store on day for his father, after he was alone he took a hammer and smashed all the idols - except for the largest. Later, upon the return of his father, Terach, the father of Abram shouted. "What happened?!" "It was amazing, Dad," replied Abram. "The idols all got into a fight and the biggest idol won!" There was no way for his father could respond; deep down he knew that Abram had found a greater truth in Monotheism. Many are the hardships that await Avram and Sarai as they begin their trek westwards from Mesopotamia to Canaan, accompanied by Avram's nephew Lot. Upon reaching the Promised Land, they are almost immediately forced to vacate it, as Canaan is struck with famine. Descending to Egypt where sustenance is to be found, they experience their first of what will amount to numerous confrontations with mercurial and malicious monarchs. By God's grace, however, they emerge unscathed and return safely to Canaan, to resume their semi-nomadic but prosperous lives as shepherds. But trial upon trial await the two. Lot, the beloved nephew whom they had adopted, chooses to leave them, to establish his camp close to Sodom, only to be later taken captive by an alliance of four marauding eastern kings. Avram marshals his household and gives chase, unexpectedly routing the invading force and rescuing his nephew, who resumes his residency in sinful Sodom.

Price: $24.00

Miketz From prison to palace

The rise of Joseph from Prison to Palace. God gave Joseph the power to interpret dreams, and when the Pharaoh had two disturbing dreams, Joseph was brought before the Pharaoh, and interpreted his dreams, of seven years of plenty, followed by seven years of famine (Gen 41:8-32).

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Joseph also suggested how to put this foreknowledge to good use, by storing produce in warehouses. Pharaoh charged Joseph, then at age thirty the rank and authority of a viceroy. When the famine came, it effected Canaan whereupon Jacob sent all his sons, except for Benjamin, to Egypt to buy food Traditions are formed not only by practices shaped by text and images, but also through oral expression. These distinctive illustrations represent the imagery of our history. Avi Katz created the designs to be part of the Ancient Ties Chai Style Collection. These exquisite images chronicle our roots by recounting the stories of the Bible.

Price: $24.00

Noah

Finding shelter from the storm.
Traditions are formed not only by practices shaped by text and images, but also through oral expression. These distinctive illustrations represent the imagery of our history. Avi Katz created the designs to be part of the Ancient Ties Chai Style Collection. These exquisite images chronicle our roots by recounting the stories of the Bible.

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Price: $24.00

Pilgrimage

The design depicts the people coming to the temple in Jerusalem offering the best of their crop. Musical instruments where played while the pilgrims paraded as was done on the three harvest/pilgrimage festivals of Succoth, Passover and Shavuot. Bringing Harvest 3 times a year to the Temple in Jerusalem.

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Since prehistoric times sacred places have exerted a mysterious attraction on billions of people around the world. Ancient legends and modern day reports tell of extraordinary things that have happened to people while visiting these places. Different sacred sites have the power to heal the body, enlighten the mind, increase creativity, develop psychic abilities, and awaken the soul to a knowing of its true purpose in life. Jerusalem, by virtue of the number and diversity of people who have held it sacred, may be considered the most holy city in the world. To the Jewish people it is the Biblical Zion, the City of David, and the site of Solomon's Temple and the eternal capital of the Israelite nation. To Christians it is where the young Jesus impressed the sages at the Jewish Temple, where he spent the last days of his ministry and where the Last Supper, the Crucifixion and the Resurrection took place. Also greatly venerated by the Muslims, it is where the prophet Muhammad ascended to heaven. Abraham's journey to the Promised Land was the first religious pilgrimage. Among the places he visited was Salem, the future site of Jerusalem. With the bringing of the Holy Ark to Jerusalem by King David and the erection there of the Temple of the Lord by King Solomon, Jerusalem became the focus of Jewish pilgrims seeking to comply with the Biblical injunction: "Three times in a year shall all thy males appear before the Lord thy God in the place which He shall choose" [Deuteronomy 16:16]. Through the centuries, Jews dispersed throughout the world have engaged in pilgrimages to their Holy City. Historically, three Jewish festivals are celebrated by making a pilgrimage to Jerusalem, to make offerings at the temple. The first of these is "Pesach" or Passover, in the spring, which marks the Jewish exodus from Egypt and freedom from bondage. The second is Shavout or Pentecost. In the summer, which commemorates both the wheat harvest, the offering of first fruits at the temple, and the giving of the law on Mt. Sinai in the desert. The third is "Sukkot" or Feast of Tabernacles, in the fall. The tabernacles or booth refer to the structures where the Israelites lived during their 40-year sojourn in the desert after the exodus from Egypt. Christian pilgrimage received a considerable stimulus in the fourth century when Empress Helena, mother of Emperor Constantine, identified the traditional sites associated with the life and death of Jesus. The sites themselves and the magnificent churches and shrines erected over them have attracted Christian pilgrims in large numbers since that time, as have other holy sites. One of the Five Pillars of the Islamic faith is the hajj, an obligatory pilgrimage to Mecca. Nevertheless, Jerusalem is known in Arabic as el-Quds ("the holy one"), and the city is home to some of the most important Islamic shrines. Among them is the Dome of the Rock, the magnificent mosque sheltering the rock from which Muhammad is believed to have ascended to heaven. The Temple Mount, upon which it stands, along with the great Mosque of el-Aqsa, is reverently called el-Haram esh-Sharif, "The Noble Sanctuary." Early pilgrimages from Europe to Jerusalem were long and difficult journeys. The flow of pilgrims was influenced by many circumstances including travel facilities, wars, epidemics, and political, religious, and economic conditions. Accounts of these journeys are rich sources of information regarding historical events, geography, and various cultures, religious practices, customs, and languages. Pilgrims' itineraries and maps were sometimes distorted by inaccurate observation, hearsay, deliberate exaggeration or fabrication, or religious preconceptions. They nevertheless provide valuable insights into the history and topography of Jerusalem and surrounding regions. Because of Muslim and Jewish prohibitions against "graven images," the majority of maps were by Christian pilgrims.

Price: $36.00

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