Mosaics decoration was first used many centuries ago. People from all over the world loved and decorated their floors, walls and places of worship with the small, wonderful, colored cut pieces.

It was the Greeks, in the four centuries BC, who raised the pebble technique to an art form, with precise geometric patterns and detailed scenes of people and animals. By 200 BC, specially manufactured pieces (“tesserae”) were being used to give extra detail and range of color to the work. Using small tesserae, meant that mosaics could imitate paintings.

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8 branched Oil Menorah / Hanukiya with Removable Shamash

While Moses was on Mount Sinai, Moses received numerous instructions regarding the building of the sanctuary and articles within this house of G-d. One of the main items in this house would be the 7 branched menorah. Twice in the book of Exodus we find a detailed description (25:31-38 and 37:17-24) of its construction and use. This candelabrum has taken many forms throughout history.

 

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Price: $75.00

8 branched Snake candle Menorah / Hanukiya White/Red

While Moses was on Mount Sinai, Moses received numerous instructions regarding the building of the sanctuary and articles within this house of G-d. One of the main items in this house would be the 7 branched menorah. Twice in the book of Exodus we find a detailed description (25:31-38 and 37:17-24) of its construction and use. This candelabrum has taken many forms throughout history.

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During the years of the Sanctuary in the desert and later in the days of the 1st and 2nd Temple the purpose of the menorah was to be a light both internal and external. The menorah is a symbol of the nation of Israel "a light unto the nations." (Isaiah 42:6). The light of the menorah as being a source of power as found in a vision of Zechariah 4:1-6. G-d explains: "Not by might, nor by power, but by My spirit." During the rule of the Antiochus the 2nd Temple was looted. After defeating the Syrians, the Hasmonaens wanted to purify the Temple and light the menorah though only enough oil for one day was found. The 8 day holiday of Chanukah commemorates the miracle that a day's worth of oil for this menorah lasted eight days. Spoils of war have marked the destruction of the first and second temple. The Romans have erected a victory arch in Rome which has the menorah being carried symbolizing the capture of Jerusalem. There are scholars who argue that this could not have been the menorah that stood in the Temple since in its depiction in the arch there are symbols of animal gods worshipped by the Romans that contradict the belief of praying to one god. After the Temples were destroyed, a prohibition by the rabbis made sure that no 3 dimensional menorah would be developed not to duplicate anything from the Temple. However, throughout the years, many artisans have chosen to express themselves artistically through using the symbol of the menorah. Israel’s first art academy, which is in Jerusalem, was named for Bezalel the biblical artisan who was commissioned to make the seven-branched gold menorah. The state of Israel has adopted the menorah design as its state emblem from the arch of Titus in Rome, Italy because for the state of Israel the menorah symbolizes the national revival of Israel as apposed to the destruction and exile it has been through which is seen in Rome, Italy.

Price: $75.00

8 branched Snake candle Menorah / Hanukiya Teal

While Moses was on Mount Sinai, Moses received numerous instructions regarding the building of the sanctuary and articles within this house of G-d. One of the main items in this house would be the 7 branched menorah. Twice in the book of Exodus we find a detailed description (25:31-38 and 37:17-24) of its construction and use. This candelabrum has taken many forms throughout history.

| READ MORE |
Additional DescriptionMore Details

During the years of the Sanctuary in the desert and later in the days of the 1st and 2nd Temple the purpose of the menorah was to be a light both internal and external. The menorah is a symbol of the nation of Israel "a light unto the nations." (Isaiah 42:6). The light of the menorah as being a source of power as found in a vision of Zechariah 4:1-6. G-d explains: "Not by might, nor by power, but by My spirit." During the rule of the Antiochus the 2nd Temple was looted. After defeating the Syrians, the Hasmonaens wanted to purify the Temple and light the menorah though only enough oil for one day was found. The 8 day holiday of Chanukah commemorates the miracle that a day's worth of oil for this menorah lasted eight days. Spoils of war have marked the destruction of the first and second temple. The Romans have erected a victory arch in Rome which has the menorah being carried symbolizing the capture of Jerusalem. There are scholars who argue that this could not have been the menorah that stood in the Temple since in its depiction in the arch there are symbols of animal gods worshipped by the Romans that contradict the belief of praying to one god. After the Temples were destroyed, a prohibition by the rabbis made sure that no 3 dimensional menorah would be developed not to duplicate anything from the Temple. However, throughout the years, many artisans have chosen to express themselves artistically through using the symbol of the menorah. Israel’s first art academy, which is in Jerusalem, was named for Bezalel the biblical artisan who was commissioned to make the seven-branched gold menorah. The state of Israel has adopted the menorah design as its state emblem from the arch of Titus in Rome, Italy because for the state of Israel the menorah symbolizes the national revival of Israel as apposed to the destruction and exile it has been through which is seen in Rome, Italy.

Price: $75.00

Aleph Bet Purple

The modern Hebrew alephbet as used in Israel today and the standard Hebrew alephbet used in today's Hebrew Bible is in fact derived from the Aramaic alphabet. It was used by Israel at the time of their Babylonian captivity. The original Hebrew alephbet is pictographic similar to Egyptian Hieroglyphs. Hebrew of today is a spoken language that is based upon the written Hebrew from old Hebrew texts, and is the only colloquial speech in the world based on a written language.

Hebrew comes from Egyptian "apiru", which was the designation used for class in the Egyptian society hiring themselves out for specific services.

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Hebrew of today is a spoken language that is based upon the written Hebrew from old Hebrew texts, and is the only colloquial speech in the world based on a written language. Hebrew consists of 22 consonants, written from right to left. Vowels are normally not written. A method of indicating vowels is ascribed to the scholar Masoretes, and today these Masoretic points are used in scriptures, children's books, and also poetry. Biblical Hebrew is noted for a relatively small vocabulary, and there were only 2 verb tenses, perfect and imperfect. This caused problems to writings that dealt with time as a central factor, and combinations of perfect and imperfect were used to expand the range of time descriptions. Archeological evidence indicates that the original Hebrew script is related to the Phoenician script that was in wide use in the Middle East region at the end of the 2nd millennium B.C., and which eventually evolved in Europe into the Greek and Roman alphabets. During the Babylonian exile , the Jews adopted a more modern form of the same script from the Babylonians. It was the "square" alphabet that is still used today. "Square"-related scripts were in use all over the Middle East for several hundred years, but following the rise of Christianity (and later, the rise of Islam), they gave way to the Roman and Arabic alphabets, respectively. According to traditional Jewish thought, the Hebrew writing system contained all the current letters at the time of Moses. Following the decline of Hebrew and Aramaic as the spoken languages of the Jews, the Hebrew alphabet was adopted in order to write down the languages of the Diaspora (Yiddish and Judaic-Spanish), probably because it was easier to teach Tanakh to the children that way. The Hebrew alphabet was retained as the official alphabet used for writing down the Hebrew language during its rebirth in the end of the 19th century.

Price: $36.00

Aleph Bet Red

The modern Hebrew alephbet as used in Israel today and the standard Hebrew alephbet used in today's Hebrew Bible is in fact derived from the Aramaic alphabet. It was used by Israel at the time of their Babylonian captivity. The original Hebrew alephbet is pictographic similar to Egyptian Hieroglyphs. Hebrew of today is a spoken language that is based upon the written Hebrew from old Hebrew texts, and is the only colloquial speech in the world based on a written language.

Hebrew comes from Egyptian "apiru", which was the designation used for class in the Egyptian society hiring themselves out for specific services.

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Additional DescriptionMore Details

Hebrew of today is a spoken language that is based upon the written Hebrew from old Hebrew texts, and is the only colloquial speech in the world based on a written language. Hebrew consists of 22 consonants, written from right to left. Vowels are normally not written. A method of indicating vowels is ascribed to the scholar Masoretes, and today these Masoretic points are used in scriptures, children's books, and also poetry. Biblical Hebrew is noted for a relatively small vocabulary, and there were only 2 verb tenses, perfect and imperfect. This caused problems to writings that dealt with time as a central factor, and combinations of perfect and imperfect were used to expand the range of time descriptions. Archeological evidence indicates that the original Hebrew script is related to the Phoenician script that was in wide use in the Middle East region at the end of the 2nd millennium B.C., and which eventually evolved in Europe into the Greek and Roman alphabets. During the Babylonian exile , the Jews adopted a more modern form of the same script from the Babylonians. It was the "square" alphabet that is still used today. "Square"-related scripts were in use all over the Middle East for several hundred years, but following the rise of Christianity (and later, the rise of Islam), they gave way to the Roman and Arabic alphabets, respectively. According to traditional Jewish thought, the Hebrew writing system contained all the current letters at the time of Moses. Following the decline of Hebrew and Aramaic as the spoken languages of the Jews, the Hebrew alphabet was adopted in order to write down the languages of the Diaspora (Yiddish and Judaic-Spanish), probably because it was easier to teach Tanakh to the children that way. The Hebrew alphabet was retained as the official alphabet used for writing down the Hebrew language during its rebirth in the end of the 19th century.

Price: $36.00

And the Bush was not consumed

“And he looked, and, behold, the bush burned with fire, and the bush was not consumed” (Exodus 3:2).

Many Biblical commentators have explored the reasons God chose the bush as a means by which to communicate with Moses, yet the bush was not consumed.

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The simplicity of the action has made us think and wonder about Moses motif to turn aside and investigate this phenomenon.The illustration shows Moses kneeling down at this holy site. The staff by his side which was used for leading his sheep and in the future will be used for leading a nation. The sheep is depict to highlight Moses concern for the individual sheep he was setting out to find. While shepherding his father-in-law's sheep in the middle of the desert, Moses spots an extraordinary phenomenon: a bush is burning, yet is not consumed (Exodus, chapter 3). Curious to know what is going on, he turns towards the Bush and... Suddenly a voice is heard. God speaks to Moses and charges him with the responsibility of saving the Hebrew people from slavery in Egypt. Why peer into that which continues to burn? Fire is, after all, a fearful phenomenon. And why use a small shrub rather than a grander imagery? That the bush is a lowly and common shrub at the "backside of the desert" attests to the humility of God, who waits there. It speaks also of its human undesirability by men who would think to find Him in more appropriate and convenient places. That the bush is burning, but "not consumed" is suggestive of the perpetuation of Israel despite its historic sufferings It also speaks of the unanswered issues of that nation's history and particularly of its unrecognized past and yet future judgments. One of the best known biblical commentators, Rashi, sees the Burning Bush as a symbol of God's sheltering presence during times when the Jews will go through "burning difficulties." Just as the Bush is sustained because the Almighty supports its existence, so too will the Almighty support the Jewish people's survival in their time of need. The Hebrew word for bush ("Sneh") is similar in spelling to the Hebrew word "Sinai." This Midrash sees the Burning Bush, then, as a symbol of the fire which will burn atop Mount Sinai during the giving of the Ten Commandments. The commentators note that a bush cannot be used for idol worship and thus Moses was hearing God's will from a medium that would be free of all spiritual pollution. Another suggestion is that the image of the Burning Bush is a prototype for all physical reality. Since the physical world is a product of Godly, spiritual creation, it is logical to assume that the physical universe should be consumed by the overwhelmingly powerful spiritual flow emanating from God. The continued existence of the entire physical universe, therefore, is very much like the continued existence of this Burning Bush. Through the symbolism of the Bush, the Almighty gave His reassurance to sustain the world. While all other prophets received God's messages in the form of images that had to be subsequently interpreted, Moses heard God's word directly without the need for intermediary images. The Burning Bush, however, is the one exception to this rule, and suggests that Moses' spiritual perceptions still were in need of development. Just as the Burning Bush is a symbol of lowliness, but pregnant with possibilities beyond the natural order, so too would Moses' later prophecies go beyond what he could spiritually perceive at the present moment ... taking him to heights that no other human would ever achieve in history.

Price: $36.00

Asher- Silk Tie- Twelve Tribes

Asher: was the eighth son of Jacob, and the second of Jacob's two sons by Zilpah, Leah's maid. The other son by Zilpah was Gad.The name Asher means "happy."When Jacob blesses his 12 sons in Genesis, chapter 49, he said that Asher would have a life blessed with an abundance of food and delicacies befitting a king (Genesis 49:20).

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The Tribe of Asher increased in size from 41,500 to 53,400 adult males during the span of two censuses described in the Book of Numbers. In Deuteronomy 33:1 and Deuteronomy 24-25, Moses, in his blessing, also predicted prosperity for the Tribe of Asher. The Tribe of Asher failed to drive out the inhabitants of Phoenician towns in the area of Israel that the tribe had been allotted as its inheritance (Judges 1:27). In the Song of Deborah, which is featured in Judges, chapter 5, the Tribe of Asher is reprimanded for not helping out during the struggle against a Canaanite king (Judges 5:17).The tribe, however, did participate in the expulsion of the Midianites and Amalekites from the Plain of Jezreel “Now these are the names of the sons of Israel, who came into Egypt with Jacob; every man came with his household: Reuben, Simeon, Levi, and Judah; Issachar, Zebulun, and Benjamin; Dan and Naphtali, Gad and Asher. And all the souls that came out of the loins of Jacob were seventy souls; and Joseph was in Egypt already”. (Exodus 1, verses 1-5) In the Bible, the Israelites are described as descendents of the twelve sons of Jacob whose name was changed to Israel in Genesis 32:28. The Bible contains about two dozen listings of the twelve sons of Jacob and/or tribes of Israel. Some of these are in very brief lists, while others are spread out over several paragraphs or chapters that discuss the distribution of the land or name certain representatives of each tribe, one after another. Once the Israelites completed the conquest of the land of Canaan during the days of Joshua, the twelve tribes split up to their assigned territory. For many years, each tribe was ruled by a series of Judges. At times enemies had to be fought but not all the tribes were united in battle. The tribes hoped to be united as the other nation through leadership of a king. The prophet Samuel, names Saul, of the tribe of Benjamin, to be the first king of Israel. After Sauls Short reign Samuel anoints David of the tribe of Judah. Israel was again united under King David, and followed so during the reign of his son King Solomon. Solomon's son, Reheboam however saw the split of Israel in two- 10 northern tribes making the kingdom of Israel (aka Northern Kingdom) and the other being the Kingdom of Judah, comprised of the tribes of Judah and Benjamin. When the Assyrian captured the Northern kingdom (tribes) around 720 BCE they disbursed the Israelites among many lands. When the Babylonian captured the Judean kingdom around 680 BCE the tribes of Judah and Benjamin held on to their identity as Judeans. It is said that all Jews descend from these two remaining tribes.

Price: $36.00

Awake O’ North and Come Yemen

 "Awake, O north wind, Come, O south wind! blow upon my garden that its perfume may spread. Let my beloved come to his garden and enjoy its luscious fruits!" (Song of Songs 4:16)

The south (Yemen) will help pollinate the garden (land of Israel). The blend of north and south is evident today in the land of Israel with the immigration of Yemenite Jewry. The illustration comes to show the blend of the Sephardi and Ashkenazi cultures. The Hebrew words suggest a messianic era.

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Yemenite Jewry has a strong rooted history in the southern part of Arabia. Perhaps traders reached this remote area as early as the time of King Solomon. Historical sources establish their appearance in Yemen just before the destruction of the first temple by the Babylonians. Due to the natural geographic isolation of the area, the Yemenite Jewish community has been able to strictly adhere to their traditions, religion and customs over the centuries. Never the less this community has maintained contact with other Jewish centers such as those in Babylonia, and the Land of Israel. The largest Jewish community was in San'a, the capital, but most Jews lived in villages dispersed throughout the country. The Jews living in villages usually enjoyed better relations with their Moslem neighbors than did city Jews. The Jews differed from their neighbors in their outward appearance. In villages, the difference was in small details, in cities in their general appearance. Jewish men had side-locks, and wore a modest head covering. Jewish women in San'a wore characteristic attire, which was very different from that of the Moslem women. During the spread of Islam, in Southern Arabia , Jews became Dhimmi, a protected religious minority. Unfortunately they were imposed with various prohibitions and laws, some of them humiliating. Never the less, they maintained their religion and a certain level of internal independence. They took measures not to be conspicuous with luxurious clothing and houses, but maintained an appearance of modesty. Most Jews were craftsmen, occupations not practiced by the Moslems, thus providing a necessary element to the country's economy. They especially excelled at silver working and in embroidery, in which they attained impressive achievements. Many Jews also practiced weaving, pottery, basketry, glaziers and construction work.

Price: $36.00

B’reishit (Genesis) The Garden of Eden

Adam and Eve, and the snake with an utopian Garden of Eden

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Traditions are formed not only by practices shaped by text and images, but also through oral expression. These distinctive illustrations represent the imagery of our history. Avi Katz created the designs to be part of the Ancient Ties Chai Style Collection. These exquisite images chronicle our roots by recounting the stories of the Bible.

Price: $24.00

Benjamin- Silk Tie- Twelve Tribes

Benjamin: was the twelfth and youngest son of Jacob. His mother was Rachel, Jacob's wife. Benjamin was born during the journey that Jacob and his family took from Padan Aram to Canaan. His mother Rachel named him "Ben-oni," meaning "Son of my sorrow," before she died during the childbirth, but Jacob called him Benjamin.The name Benjamin means "Son of my right hand." Joseph, Benjamin's brother was sold into slavery by his other brothers.

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Joseph later became prime minister of Egypt, and when Joseph's brothers refused to abandon Benjamin, after Joseph put them to a test, Joseph realized his brothers had a change of heart and were willing to risk their lives for their youngest brother. Through this test, the whole family of Jacob was joyously reunited. When Jacob blesses his 12 sons, in Genesis 49, he describes Benjamin as a wolf that prowls, devouring his enemies in the morning and dividing up the spoils in the evening. (Genesis 49:27). King Saul, the Judge Ehud, and the prophet Jeremiah were descendants of Benjamin.After the division of the Kingdom, the land of Benjamin served as a buffer zone between Israel and Judah. “Now these are the names of the sons of Israel, who came into Egypt with Jacob; every man came with his household: Reuben, Simeon, Levi, and Judah; Issachar, Zebulun, and Benjamin; Dan and Naphtali, Gad and Asher. And all the souls that came out of the loins of Jacob were seventy souls; and Joseph was in Egypt already”. (Exodus 1, verses 1-5) In the Bible, the Israelites are described as descendents of the twelve sons of Jacob whose name was changed to Israel in Genesis 32:28. The Bible contains about two dozen listings of the twelve sons of Jacob and/or tribes of Israel. Some of these are in very brief lists, while others are spread out over several paragraphs or chapters that discuss the distribution of the land or name certain representatives of each tribe, one after another. Once the Israelites completed the conquest of the land of Canaan during the days of Joshua, the twelve tribes split up to their assigned territory. For many years, each tribe was ruled by a series of Judges. At times enemies had to be fought but not all the tribes were united in battle. The tribes hoped to be united as the other nation through leadership of a king. The prophet Samuel, names Saul, of the tribe of Benjamin, to be the first king of Israel. After Sauls Short reign Samuel anoints David of the tribe of Judah. Israel was again united under King David, and followed so during the reign of his son King Solomon. Solomon's son, Reheboam however saw the split of Israel in two- 10 northern tribes making the kingdom of Israel (aka Northern Kingdom) and the other being the Kingdom of Judah, comprised of the tribes of Judah and Benjamin. When the Assyrian captured the Northern kingdom (tribes) around 720 BCE they disbursed the Israelites among many lands. When the Babylonian captured the Judean kingdom around 680 BCE the tribes of Judah and Benjamin held on to their identity as Judeans. It is said that all Jews descend from these two remaining tribes.

Price: $36.00

Birds Hair Barrettes – Back to Back Birds

Hair combs and ornaments are found in archaeological sites dating from as early as 12,000 years ago made from shell bone and wood.

These hardwood barrettes are emblazoned with designs patterned after those found on pottery of the Canaanite, Egyptian and Philistine peoples from before the period of the Exodus through the period of the Israelite kings.

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Typical motifs found on the pottery were fish and birds looking back ( Philistine), birds and palm, Ibex and palm (Canaanite) and geometrical patterns. Many of the barrettes show patterns taken from pottery discovered on archaeological excavation in Israel, at Megiddo and Lachish.

Price: $15.00

Birds Hair Barrettes – Bird

Hair combs and ornaments are found in archaeological sites dating from as early as 12,000 years ago made from shell bone and wood.

These hardwood barrettes are emblazoned with designs patterned after those found on pottery of the Canaanite, Egyptian and Philistine peoples from before the period of the Exodus through the period of the Israelite kings.

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Additional DescriptionMore Details

Typical motifs found on the pottery were fish and birds looking back ( Philistine), birds and palm, Ibex and palm (Canaanite) and geometrical patterns. Many of the barrettes show patterns taken from pottery discovered on archaeological excavation in Israel, at Megiddo and Lachish.

Price: $15.00

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