Glass Art

Glass has been known to man for at least 3500 years. First made in Egypt, and then in Syria, glass vessels produced in a variety of ways were extremely popular throughout the Roman world. Syria was an important production centre making high quality decorative glass and exporting it to the rest of the Roman Empire.

Glass captured the imagination of artisans in ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, who used it to fashion minute objects such as pendants, beads and inlays.

In the mid-second millennium BCE, small glass containers were first produced as luxury items for the royal courts.

These vessels were made in the core-forming technique in a variety of hues – principally deep blue, turquoise, yellow and white – which emulated semi-precious metals. Over the centuries various casting methods, as well as mosaic-glass and gold-glass techniques, were employed. As the demand for glass vessels increased, sophisticated production methods evolved and new forms were introduced.

The style of these glass jars is reminiscent of the ancient and delicate glass vessels that were found in archaeological excavations in Israel and are currently displayed in exclusive museums.

Each piece is uniquely mouth blown and hand painted in Jerusalem, Israel by the Neker brothers. They have been blowing glass since 1959.

During the 1st Century glass came into daily use with a large variety of different wares being made. The characteristic transparency, delicacy, and subtle colors, as well as many of the forms – wineglasses, bottles, juglets and jars – that were introduced in the Roman period are still the trademarks of glassware today.

Many of the vessels in this collection would have been used in a Roman citizen’s daily life as containers for oils, scents, foodstuffs and perfumed waters.

Glass has been known to man for at least 3500 years. First made in Egypt, and then in Syria, glass vessels produced in a variety of ways were extremely popular throughout the Roman world.

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8 branched Oil Menorah / Hanukiya with Removable Shamash

While Moses was on Mount Sinai, Moses received numerous instructions regarding the building of the sanctuary and articles within this house of G-d. One of the main items in this house would be the 7 branched menorah. Twice in the book of Exodus we find a detailed description (25:31-38 and 37:17-24) of its construction and use. This candelabrum has taken many forms throughout history.

 

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Price: $75.00

8 branched Snake candle Menorah / Hanukiya White/Red

While Moses was on Mount Sinai, Moses received numerous instructions regarding the building of the sanctuary and articles within this house of G-d. One of the main items in this house would be the 7 branched menorah. Twice in the book of Exodus we find a detailed description (25:31-38 and 37:17-24) of its construction and use. This candelabrum has taken many forms throughout history.

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During the years of the Sanctuary in the desert and later in the days of the 1st and 2nd Temple the purpose of the menorah was to be a light both internal and external. The menorah is a symbol of the nation of Israel "a light unto the nations." (Isaiah 42:6). The light of the menorah as being a source of power as found in a vision of Zechariah 4:1-6. G-d explains: "Not by might, nor by power, but by My spirit." During the rule of the Antiochus the 2nd Temple was looted. After defeating the Syrians, the Hasmonaens wanted to purify the Temple and light the menorah though only enough oil for one day was found. The 8 day holiday of Chanukah commemorates the miracle that a day's worth of oil for this menorah lasted eight days. Spoils of war have marked the destruction of the first and second temple. The Romans have erected a victory arch in Rome which has the menorah being carried symbolizing the capture of Jerusalem. There are scholars who argue that this could not have been the menorah that stood in the Temple since in its depiction in the arch there are symbols of animal gods worshipped by the Romans that contradict the belief of praying to one god. After the Temples were destroyed, a prohibition by the rabbis made sure that no 3 dimensional menorah would be developed not to duplicate anything from the Temple. However, throughout the years, many artisans have chosen to express themselves artistically through using the symbol of the menorah. Israel’s first art academy, which is in Jerusalem, was named for Bezalel the biblical artisan who was commissioned to make the seven-branched gold menorah. The state of Israel has adopted the menorah design as its state emblem from the arch of Titus in Rome, Italy because for the state of Israel the menorah symbolizes the national revival of Israel as apposed to the destruction and exile it has been through which is seen in Rome, Italy.

Price: $75.00

8 branched Snake candle Menorah / Hanukiya Teal

While Moses was on Mount Sinai, Moses received numerous instructions regarding the building of the sanctuary and articles within this house of G-d. One of the main items in this house would be the 7 branched menorah. Twice in the book of Exodus we find a detailed description (25:31-38 and 37:17-24) of its construction and use. This candelabrum has taken many forms throughout history.

| READ MORE |
Additional DescriptionMore Details

During the years of the Sanctuary in the desert and later in the days of the 1st and 2nd Temple the purpose of the menorah was to be a light both internal and external. The menorah is a symbol of the nation of Israel "a light unto the nations." (Isaiah 42:6). The light of the menorah as being a source of power as found in a vision of Zechariah 4:1-6. G-d explains: "Not by might, nor by power, but by My spirit." During the rule of the Antiochus the 2nd Temple was looted. After defeating the Syrians, the Hasmonaens wanted to purify the Temple and light the menorah though only enough oil for one day was found. The 8 day holiday of Chanukah commemorates the miracle that a day's worth of oil for this menorah lasted eight days. Spoils of war have marked the destruction of the first and second temple. The Romans have erected a victory arch in Rome which has the menorah being carried symbolizing the capture of Jerusalem. There are scholars who argue that this could not have been the menorah that stood in the Temple since in its depiction in the arch there are symbols of animal gods worshipped by the Romans that contradict the belief of praying to one god. After the Temples were destroyed, a prohibition by the rabbis made sure that no 3 dimensional menorah would be developed not to duplicate anything from the Temple. However, throughout the years, many artisans have chosen to express themselves artistically through using the symbol of the menorah. Israel’s first art academy, which is in Jerusalem, was named for Bezalel the biblical artisan who was commissioned to make the seven-branched gold menorah. The state of Israel has adopted the menorah design as its state emblem from the arch of Titus in Rome, Italy because for the state of Israel the menorah symbolizes the national revival of Israel as apposed to the destruction and exile it has been through which is seen in Rome, Italy.

Price: $75.00

Church of Holy Sepulchre Ornament

A sepulchre is a burial chamber. In ancient Hebrew practice, it was carved into the rock of a hillside. It is first mentioned as purchased by Abraham for Sarah from Ephron the Hittite (Gen. 23:20). This was the "cave of the field of Machpelah," where also Abraham and Rebekah and Jacob and Leah were buried (79:29-32). In Acts 7:16 it is said that Jacob was "laid in the sepulchre that Abraham bought for a sum of money of the sons of Emmor the father of Sychem."

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The term sepulchre is most often used for the sepulchral burial site of Jesus in Jerusalem, over which the Church of the Holy Sepulchre has been erected. The Church is the holiest Christian site in Jerusalem and Israel. The Church contains the Chapel of Golgotha and three Stations of the Cross, as well as the place of Jesus Christ's burial and resurrection. The church stands in the place where a temple dedicated to Aphrodite used to stand. This temple was built during the Roman Empire's time on the location where Christ was crucified and buried, so it will be forgotten. Ironically, the building of the temple actually preserved the exact burial site's location. This design has been painted from the inside of the glass by skilled artisan. This ancient technique is achieved by special curved brushes that are inserted from the top hole. The Church of the Holy Sepulchre was built by Constantine I the Great during the fourth century, after he became Christian, and turned Christianity to the official religion of the Roman Empire. In the year 326, Constantine I sent his mother, Helena, to seek the Crucifixion location in Jerusalem. Helena found the place and also found the remains of the cross itself. In that same place, 7 years later, Constantine I founded the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in the year 333.At the time of the Persian occupation of Jerusalem in the year of 614, most of the church’s structure was ruined. The church was built again in a more limited composition, but during the 11th century was facing demolition again by the hands of the Calif Al-Hakim bi-Amr Allah. This danger initiated the crusades, whose call was to return the Church of the Holy Sepulchre and Jerusalem to Christian hands. When the crusaders occupied Jerusalem in 1099, they rebuilt the church. After Jerusalem's occupation by the hands of Salah A-Din in the year of 1187, The Church Holy Sepulchre was given for safe keeping to two Moslem families, the Nusseibeh and the Joudeh families, who own the place today, and currently hold the keys to the church. The place where Jesus Christ was crucified is named Golgotha (the place of the skull). This hill is situated inside the structure of the church. Actually, it looks like this hill is named so because of its form, the reminding of a person's skull. Other traditions tied to this place say that this is the burial site of the first man, and is also the place where the binding of Isaac by Abraham occurred. Nowadays, there is a chapel on this hill, where tradition points to the exact place where Christ's cross was placed. After Christ was taken down from the cross, Joseph of Arimathea buried him in a tomb that Joseph had donated. When the church was built on that spot 300 years later, the hill around the tomb was removed, so only a small structure remains, on a flat surface. A rotunda was built around the tomb's structure, with a large dome.

Price: $30.00

Church of Nativity Ornament

Bethlehem is placed sacred to all three religions: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Bethlehem (House of Bread ) is located about 10 Kilometers (6 miles) southwest of Jerusalem by the hill country of Judea on the way to Hebron. It is first mentioned in the Tel al Amarna letters from the Egyptian Governor of Palestine to Pharaoh Amnehotep.

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Bethlehem plays a significant part in the Old Testament, in the history of the Israelites, both before they entered Egypt and slavery, and after the Exodus. In the Bible, it is first mentioned as "Ephrata" in connection with the death of Rachel, Jacob's beloved wife whom he buried outside the town when she died in childbirth. The Tomb of Rachel is a pilgrimage place for Jews and Muslims alike. Among other Biblical mentions and Holy Sites in Bethlehem: Rachel's tomb, Naomi and Ruth, Samuel anoints King David and the well from which David's warriors brought him waters. In the bible it is called "Bethlehem of Judah" (belonging to the tribe of Judah), to distinguish it from the other Bethlehem, which was in the North in the territory of the Zebulon. This design has been painted from the inside of the glass by skilled artisan. This ancient technique is achieved by special curved brushes that are inserted from the top hole. David, the youngest son of a Bethlehem-farmer (a shepherd) is chosen and anointed by the Prophet Samuel on behalf of the Lord as a king. (First Samuel 17:12). According to Matthew 2 and Luke 2, Jesus was born in Bethlehem, and Matthew interpreted this as the fulfillment of Micah's prophecy. In effect it became a sort of official rightful place of the family line of David. Christian tradition, perhaps as early as the second century CE, identified a cave as the site of Jesus' birth. About 338 CE Constantine, the Roman emperor and his mother, Helena, built a church over the grotto and In 527 Justinian the Emperor of the Byzantine Empire resettled in Bethlehem, his reign was one of great prosperity and expansion of churches. The site of the Nativity is a central pilgrimage destination for Christians from all over the world. When the Muslims began their conquests out of Arabia, the Caliph Omar visited Bethlehem in 638 and out of respect for Christianity, ordered the Church of Nativity to be preserved. The central mosque on Manger Square in named after Caliph Omar. Bethlehem was a city of importance to the Crusaders, who conquered it in the year 1100. Over years of wars between the Crusaders and the Muslims the city was destroyed, and then subsequently rebuilt. The Turks destroyed the city in 1244, but the church somehow escaped, Bethlehem was rebuilt once again. When finally the Crusaders were driven from Palestine in 1291, the Muslim rulers used the holy places for political and financial ends. Although Bethlehem was still nominally endowed, collection of revenue from the land was impossible. In 1332 Pope John XXII wrote to Edward III of England, to David II of Scotland and to Simon of Meopham, Archbishop of Canterbury, asking them to help the bishop of Bethlehem to regain his interest and so enable him to return to Bethlehem and carry out repairs. Decay and destruction proceeded over the years as a result of fighting between the local Christian and Muslim residents.

Price: $30.00

Glass Color Filled Spinning Tops/Dreidels Blue

These spinning tops are hand made. Give them a spin and watch the color rise to the sides. These Dreidles have the 4 letters represented the phrase " a great miracle happened here" since they are made in Jerusalem, Israel.

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Price: $15.00

Glass Color Filled Spinning Tops/Dreidels Green

These spinning tops are hand made. Give them a spin and watch the color rise to the sides. These Dreidles have the 4 letters represented the phrase " a great miracle happened here" since they are made in Jerusalem, Israel.

 

 

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Price: $15.00

Glass Color Filled Spinning Tops/Dreidels Orange

These spinning tops are hand made. Give them a spin and watch the color rise to the sides. These Dreidles have the 4 letters represented the phrase " a great miracle happened here" since they are made in Jerusalem, Israel.

 

 

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Price: $15.00

Glass Color Filled Spinning Tops/Dreidels Pink

These spinning tops are hand made. Give them a spin and watch the color rise to the sides. These Dreidles have the 4 letters represented the phrase " a great miracle happened here" since they are made in Jerusalem, Israel.

 

 

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Price: $15.00

King Tutankhamun Burial Chamber Wall Ornament

This design is taken from the wall behind the casket around King Tut’s mummy in the burial chamber itself. Only the burial chamber received decorations. On the west wall are scenes depicting the apes of the first hour of the Amduat the Book of the Secret Chamber. In this book the dead pharaoh travels through the underworld to the afterlife in his solar boat.

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On the south wall the king is followed by Anubis as he appears before Hathor. Here, there is also a scene of the King being welcomed into the underworld by Hathor, Anubis and Isis. The north wall depicts the King before Nut with the royal ka embracing Osiris. On the same wall, we also find the scene of Ay performing the opening of the Mouth ritual before the mummy of Tutankhamen. In this case the person performing this duty is Ay, who became the next pharaoh The ritual allowed the mummy, to eat, breathe, see, hear and enjoy the offerings and provisions performed by the priests and officiates, thus to sustain the ka. On the east wall, Tut's mummy is depicted being pulled on a sledge during the funeral procession. Within the procession are two viziers to the king, and a third person who might be Horemheb. This design has been painted from the inside of the glass by skilled artisan. This ancient technique is achieved by special curved brushes that are inserted from the top hole. Egypt is our window to humanity's distant past and in understanding its history, we find mankind's greatest glories and achievements, as well as his often repeated mistakes. We may follow along with the building of empires, only to see them collapse again and again. We find great men and rulers of renowned, but we often also see their ultimate demise. We learn about religion, its evolution and, as the world grows older, its replacement with newer religions. Yet, the ancient Egyptian religion has never really completely died out. Even today, many Egyptians continue customs, including some aspects of religion, held over from thousands of years ago. In fact, throughout the world, aspects of the ancient Egyptian religion, particularly funerary, continue to make an impact on our modern lives. The designs of the neckwear are based on elements found on the coffins of king Tutankhamen. There is probably no more famous group of artifacts in the world then those associated with the discovery of young King Tutankhamen's tomb. Tutankhamen died as young as 16 or 17 years of age. He was probably a son of King Akhenaton by one of his secondary wives. His wife Ankhesenamun was daughter of Akhenaton and Nefertiti. Tutankhamen came to the throne as a young child and ruled for about nine years under the regency of Vizier Ay and the strong influence of the army commander Horemheb. The main events of his reign were to move the capital of Egypt back from El-Amarna to Memphis and to begin the transition from the monotheistic cult of Aton created by Akhenaton back to the polytheistic religion of Egypt with Amun-Ra again as the main God.

Price: $30.00

King Tutankhamun War Chest Chariot Ornament

This design is taken from the wooden war chest which was found in the Antechamber of Tut’s tomb. It is one of the most intricately decorated objects in the tomb. Fierce confrontations take place on both sides of the chest. King Tut is depicted in his chariot trampling Hittites on one side and Nubians on the other. Both his horses leap forward, rearing on hind legs, wild eyed, crushing the enemy. Plumed headdresses rise from caps on the crests of the horses' necks.

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The king drives his chariot with the reins tied around his waist, so that he may free his hands to draw his bow. Immediately following the king's chariot, three fan bearers shield the king from the sun with feather fans on tall poles. Additional Egyptian soldiers help to fight the enemy. This design has been painted from the inside of the glass by skilled artisan. This ancient technique is achieved by special curved brushes that are inserted from the top hole. The enemy is frequently depicted as a confused mass. Chaos and disorder were considered disgraceful to the ancient Egyptian, since they represented the opposites of the balance and harmony upon which their entire culture was based. This is why scholars believe that the artists who composed the military reliefs for the pharaohs incorporated significant symbolism. Egypt is our window to humanity's distant past and in understanding its history, we find mankind's greatest glories and achievements, as well as his often repeated mistakes. We may follow along with the building of empires, only to see them collapse again and again. We find great men and rulers of renowned, but we often also see their ultimate demise. We learn about religion, its evolution and, as the world grows older, its replacement with newer religions. Yet, the ancient Egyptian religion has never really completely died out. Even today, many Egyptians continue customs, including some aspects of religion, held over from thousands of years ago. In fact, throughout the world, aspects of the ancient Egyptian religion, particularly funerary, continue to make an impact on our modern lives. There is probably no more famous group of artifacts in the world then those associated with the discovery of young King Tutankhamen's tomb. Tutankhamen died as young as 16 or 17 years of age. He was probably a son of King Akhenaton by one of his secondary wives. His wife Ankhesenamun was daughter of Akhenaton and Nefertiti. Tutankhamen came to the throne as a young child and ruled for about nine years under the regency of Vizier Ay and the strong influence of the army commander Horemheb. The main events of his reign were to move the capital of Egypt back from El-Amarna to Memphis and to begin the transition from the monotheistic cult of Aton created by Akhenaton back to the polytheistic religion of Egypt with Amun-Ra again as the main God.

Price: $30.00

Neker Glass Candle Holders Green (set of 2)

Glass has been known to man for at least 3500 years. First made in Egypt, and then in Syria, glass vessels produced in a variety of ways were extremely popular throughout the Roman world. Syria was an important production center making high quality decorative glass and exporting it to the rest of the Roman Empire.  The Neker glass holders  will make any occasions special.

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Additional DescriptionMore Details

Glass captured the imagination of artisans in ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, who used it to fashion minute objects such as pendants, beads and inlays. In the mid-second millennium BCE, small glass containers were first produced as luxury items for the royal courts. These vessels were made in the core-forming technique in a variety of hues - principally deep blue, turquoise, yellow and white - which emulated semi-precious metals. Over the centuries various casting methods, as well as mosaic-glass and gold-glass techniques, were employed. As the demand for glass vessels increased, sophisticated production methods evolved and new forms were introduced. During the 1st Century glass came into daily use with a large variety of different wares being made. The characteristic transparency, delicacy, and subtle colors, as well as many of the forms - wineglasses, bottles, juglets and jars - that were introduced in the Roman period are still the trademarks of glassware today. Many of the vessels in this collection would have been used in a Roman citizen's daily life as containers for oils, scents, foodstuffs and perfumed waters. The pieces are hand blown in Jerusalem, Israel by the Neker brothers. They have been blowing glass since 1959.

Price: $45.00

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