History has shown us the importance of the physical relationship we have with certain places. Whether it is a pilgrimage site, an event which has occurred or will occur at a certain location, or words within a sonnet enlivening a town, city or building, an intimate bond is forged with these, most holy places.

Please login to start shopping.

Pages: 1 2 3 4 5Next >Last »

And the Bush was not consumed

“And he looked, and, behold, the bush burned with fire, and the bush was not consumed” (Exodus 3:2).

Many Biblical commentators have explored the reasons God chose the bush as a means by which to communicate with Moses, yet the bush was not consumed.

| READ MORE |
Additional DescriptionMore Details

The simplicity of the action has made us think and wonder about Moses motif to turn aside and investigate this phenomenon.The illustration shows Moses kneeling down at this holy site. The staff by his side which was used for leading his sheep and in the future will be used for leading a nation. The sheep is depict to highlight Moses concern for the individual sheep he was setting out to find. While shepherding his father-in-law’s sheep in the middle of the desert, Moses spots an extraordinary phenomenon: a bush is burning, yet is not consumed (Exodus, chapter 3). Curious to know what is going on, he turns towards the Bush and… Suddenly a voice is heard. God speaks to Moses and charges him with the responsibility of saving the Hebrew people from slavery in Egypt. Why peer into that which continues to burn? Fire is, after all, a fearful phenomenon. And why use a small shrub rather than a grander imagery? That the bush is a lowly and common shrub at the “backside of the desert” attests to the humility of God, who waits there. It speaks also of its human undesirability by men who would think to find Him in more appropriate and convenient places. That the bush is burning, but “not consumed” is suggestive of the perpetuation of Israel despite its historic sufferings It also speaks of the unanswered issues of that nation’s history and particularly of its unrecognized past and yet future judgments. One of the best known biblical commentators, Rashi, sees the Burning Bush as a symbol of God’s sheltering presence during times when the Jews will go through “burning difficulties.” Just as the Bush is sustained because the Almighty supports its existence, so too will the Almighty support the Jewish people’s survival in their time of need. The Hebrew word for bush (“Sneh”) is similar in spelling to the Hebrew word “Sinai.” This Midrash sees the Burning Bush, then, as a symbol of the fire which will burn atop Mount Sinai during the giving of the Ten Commandments. The commentators note that a bush cannot be used for idol worship and thus Moses was hearing God’s will from a medium that would be free of all spiritual pollution. Another suggestion is that the image of the Burning Bush is a prototype for all physical reality. Since the physical world is a product of Godly, spiritual creation, it is logical to assume that the physical universe should be consumed by the overwhelmingly powerful spiritual flow emanating from God. The continued existence of the entire physical universe, therefore, is very much like the continued existence of this Burning Bush. Through the symbolism of the Bush, the Almighty gave His reassurance to sustain the world. While all other prophets received God’s messages in the form of images that had to be subsequently interpreted, Moses heard God’s word directly without the need for intermediary images. The Burning Bush, however, is the one exception to this rule, and suggests that Moses’ spiritual perceptions still were in need of development. Just as the Burning Bush is a symbol of lowliness, but pregnant with possibilities beyond the natural order, so too would Moses’ later prophecies go beyond what he could spiritually perceive at the present moment … taking him to heights that no other human would ever achieve in history.

Price: $36.00

Asher- Silk Tie- Twelve Tribes

Asher: was the eighth son of Jacob, and the second of Jacob’s two sons by Zilpah, Leah’s maid. The other son by Zilpah was Gad.The name Asher means “happy.”When Jacob blesses his 12 sons in Genesis, chapter 49, he said that Asher would have a life blessed with an abundance of food and delicacies befitting a king (Genesis 49:20).

| READ MORE |
Additional DescriptionMore Details

The Tribe of Asher increased in size from 41,500 to 53,400 adult males during the span of two censuses described in the Book of Numbers. In Deuteronomy 33:1 and Deuteronomy 24-25, Moses, in his blessing, also predicted prosperity for the Tribe of Asher. The Tribe of Asher failed to drive out the inhabitants of Phoenician towns in the area of Israel that the tribe had been allotted as its inheritance (Judges 1:27). In the Song of Deborah, which is featured in Judges, chapter 5, the Tribe of Asher is reprimanded for not helping out during the struggle against a Canaanite king (Judges 5:17).The tribe, however, did participate in the expulsion of the Midianites and Amalekites from the Plain of Jezreel “Now these are the names of the sons of Israel, who came into Egypt with Jacob; every man came with his household: Reuben, Simeon, Levi, and Judah; Issachar, Zebulun, and Benjamin; Dan and Naphtali, Gad and Asher. And all the souls that came out of the loins of Jacob were seventy souls; and Joseph was in Egypt already”. (Exodus 1, verses 1-5) In the Bible, the Israelites are described as descendents of the twelve sons of Jacob whose name was changed to Israel in Genesis 32:28. The Bible contains about two dozen listings of the twelve sons of Jacob and/or tribes of Israel. Some of these are in very brief lists, while others are spread out over several paragraphs or chapters that discuss the distribution of the land or name certain representatives of each tribe, one after another. Once the Israelites completed the conquest of the land of Canaan during the days of Joshua, the twelve tribes split up to their assigned territory. For many years, each tribe was ruled by a series of Judges. At times enemies had to be fought but not all the tribes were united in battle. The tribes hoped to be united as the other nation through leadership of a king. The prophet Samuel, names Saul, of the tribe of Benjamin, to be the first king of Israel. After Sauls Short reign Samuel anoints David of the tribe of Judah. Israel was again united under King David, and followed so during the reign of his son King Solomon. Solomon’s son, Reheboam however saw the split of Israel in two- 10 northern tribes making the kingdom of Israel (aka Northern Kingdom) and the other being the Kingdom of Judah, comprised of the tribes of Judah and Benjamin. When the Assyrian captured the Northern kingdom (tribes) around 720 BCE they disbursed the Israelites among many lands. When the Babylonian captured the Judean kingdom around 680 BCE the tribes of Judah and Benjamin held on to their identity as Judeans. It is said that all Jews descend from these two remaining tribes.

Price: $36.00

B’reishit (Genesis) The Garden of Eden

Adam and Eve, and the snake with an utopian Garden of Eden

| READ MORE |
Additional DescriptionMore Details

Traditions are formed not only by practices shaped by text and images, but also through oral expression. These distinctive illustrations represent the imagery of our history. Avi Katz created the designs to be part of the Ancient Ties Chai Style Collection. These exquisite images chronicle our roots by recounting the stories of the Bible.

Price: $24.00

Benjamin- Silk Tie- Twelve Tribes

Benjamin: was the twelfth and youngest son of Jacob. His mother was Rachel, Jacob’s wife. Benjamin was born during the journey that Jacob and his family took from Padan Aram to Canaan. His mother Rachel named him “Ben-oni,” meaning “Son of my sorrow,” before she died during the childbirth, but Jacob called him Benjamin.The name Benjamin means “Son of my right hand.” Joseph, Benjamin’s brother was sold into slavery by his other brothers.

| READ MORE |
Additional DescriptionMore Details

Joseph later became prime minister of Egypt, and when Joseph’s brothers refused to abandon Benjamin, after Joseph put them to a test, Joseph realized his brothers had a change of heart and were willing to risk their lives for their youngest brother. Through this test, the whole family of Jacob was joyously reunited. When Jacob blesses his 12 sons, in Genesis 49, he describes Benjamin as a wolf that prowls, devouring his enemies in the morning and dividing up the spoils in the evening. (Genesis 49:27). King Saul, the Judge Ehud, and the prophet Jeremiah were descendants of Benjamin.After the division of the Kingdom, the land of Benjamin served as a buffer zone between Israel and Judah. “Now these are the names of the sons of Israel, who came into Egypt with Jacob; every man came with his household: Reuben, Simeon, Levi, and Judah; Issachar, Zebulun, and Benjamin; Dan and Naphtali, Gad and Asher. And all the souls that came out of the loins of Jacob were seventy souls; and Joseph was in Egypt already”. (Exodus 1, verses 1-5) In the Bible, the Israelites are described as descendents of the twelve sons of Jacob whose name was changed to Israel in Genesis 32:28. The Bible contains about two dozen listings of the twelve sons of Jacob and/or tribes of Israel. Some of these are in very brief lists, while others are spread out over several paragraphs or chapters that discuss the distribution of the land or name certain representatives of each tribe, one after another. Once the Israelites completed the conquest of the land of Canaan during the days of Joshua, the twelve tribes split up to their assigned territory. For many years, each tribe was ruled by a series of Judges. At times enemies had to be fought but not all the tribes were united in battle. The tribes hoped to be united as the other nation through leadership of a king. The prophet Samuel, names Saul, of the tribe of Benjamin, to be the first king of Israel. After Sauls Short reign Samuel anoints David of the tribe of Judah. Israel was again united under King David, and followed so during the reign of his son King Solomon. Solomon’s son, Reheboam however saw the split of Israel in two- 10 northern tribes making the kingdom of Israel (aka Northern Kingdom) and the other being the Kingdom of Judah, comprised of the tribes of Judah and Benjamin. When the Assyrian captured the Northern kingdom (tribes) around 720 BCE they disbursed the Israelites among many lands. When the Babylonian captured the Judean kingdom around 680 BCE the tribes of Judah and Benjamin held on to their identity as Judeans. It is said that all Jews descend from these two remaining tribes.

Price: $36.00

Birds Hair Barrettes – Back to Back Birds

Hair combs and ornaments are found in archaeological sites dating from as early as 12,000 years ago made from shell bone and wood.

These hardwood barrettes are emblazoned with designs patterned after those found on pottery of the Canaanite, Egyptian and Philistine peoples from before the period of the Exodus through the period of the Israelite kings.

| READ MORE |
Additional DescriptionMore Details

Typical motifs found on the pottery were fish and birds looking back ( Philistine), birds and palm, Ibex and palm (Canaanite) and geometrical patterns. Many of the barrettes show patterns taken from pottery discovered on archaeological excavation in Israel, at Megiddo and Lachish.

Price: $15.00

Birds Hair Barrettes – Bird

Hair combs and ornaments are found in archaeological sites dating from as early as 12,000 years ago made from shell bone and wood.

These hardwood barrettes are emblazoned with designs patterned after those found on pottery of the Canaanite, Egyptian and Philistine peoples from before the period of the Exodus through the period of the Israelite kings.

| READ MORE |
Additional DescriptionMore Details

Typical motifs found on the pottery were fish and birds looking back ( Philistine), birds and palm, Ibex and palm (Canaanite) and geometrical patterns. Many of the barrettes show patterns taken from pottery discovered on archaeological excavation in Israel, at Megiddo and Lachish.

Price: $15.00

Birds Hair Barrettes – Peacock

Hair combs and ornaments are found in archaeological sites dating from as early as 12,000 years ago made from shell bone and wood.

These hardwood barrettes are emblazoned with designs patterned after those found on pottery of the Canaanite, Egyptian and Philistine peoples from before the period of the Exodus through the period of the Israelite kings.

 

| READ MORE |
Additional DescriptionMore Details

Typical motifs found on the pottery were fish and birds looking back ( Philistine), birds and palm, Ibex and palm (Canaanite) and geometrical patterns. Animal motifs are traditional in many ancient cultures. Many of the barrettes show patterns taken from pottery discovered on archaeological excavation in Israel, at Megiddo and Lachish.

Price: $15.00

Chayei Sara An important meeting at the well

In ancient days the well was a common meeting place. Eliezer, the servant of Abraham begins to learn of the fine qualities of Rebecca.

| READ MORE |
Additional DescriptionMore Details

Traditions are formed not only by practices shaped by text and images, but also through oral expression. These distinctive illustrations represent the imagery of our history. Avi Katz created the designs to be part of the Ancient Ties Chai Style Collection. These exquisite images chronicle our roots by recounting the stories of the Bible.

Price: $24.00

Church of Holy Sepulchre Ornament

A sepulchre is a burial chamber. In ancient Hebrew practice, it was carved into the rock of a hillside. It is first mentioned as purchased by Abraham for Sarah from Ephron the Hittite (Gen. 23:20). This was the “cave of the field of Machpelah,” where also Abraham and Rebekah and Jacob and Leah were buried (79:29-32). In Acts 7:16 it is said that Jacob was “laid in the sepulchre that Abraham bought for a sum of money of the sons of Emmor the father of Sychem.”

| READ MORE |
Additional DescriptionMore Details

The term sepulchre is most often used for the sepulchral burial site of Jesus in Jerusalem, over which the Church of the Holy Sepulchre has been erected. The Church is the holiest Christian site in Jerusalem and Israel. The Church contains the Chapel of Golgotha and three Stations of the Cross, as well as the place of Jesus Christ’s burial and resurrection. The church stands in the place where a temple dedicated to Aphrodite used to stand. This temple was built during the Roman Empire’s time on the location where Christ was crucified and buried, so it will be forgotten. Ironically, the building of the temple actually preserved the exact burial site’s location. This design has been painted from the inside of the glass by skilled artisan. This ancient technique is achieved by special curved brushes that are inserted from the top hole. The Church of the Holy Sepulchre was built by Constantine I the Great during the fourth century, after he became Christian, and turned Christianity to the official religion of the Roman Empire. In the year 326, Constantine I sent his mother, Helena, to seek the Crucifixion location in Jerusalem. Helena found the place and also found the remains of the cross itself. In that same place, 7 years later, Constantine I founded the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in the year 333.At the time of the Persian occupation of Jerusalem in the year of 614, most of the church’s structure was ruined. The church was built again in a more limited composition, but during the 11th century was facing demolition again by the hands of the Calif Al-Hakim bi-Amr Allah. This danger initiated the crusades, whose call was to return the Church of the Holy Sepulchre and Jerusalem to Christian hands. When the crusaders occupied Jerusalem in 1099, they rebuilt the church. After Jerusalem’s occupation by the hands of Salah A-Din in the year of 1187, The Church Holy Sepulchre was given for safe keeping to two Moslem families, the Nusseibeh and the Joudeh families, who own the place today, and currently hold the keys to the church. The place where Jesus Christ was crucified is named Golgotha (the place of the skull). This hill is situated inside the structure of the church. Actually, it looks like this hill is named so because of its form, the reminding of a person’s skull. Other traditions tied to this place say that this is the burial site of the first man, and is also the place where the binding of Isaac by Abraham occurred. Nowadays, there is a chapel on this hill, where tradition points to the exact place where Christ’s cross was placed. After Christ was taken down from the cross, Joseph of Arimathea buried him in a tomb that Joseph had donated. When the church was built on that spot 300 years later, the hill around the tomb was removed, so only a small structure remains, on a flat surface. A rotunda was built around the tomb’s structure, with a large dome.

Price: $30.00

Church of Nativity Ornament

Bethlehem is placed sacred to all three religions: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Bethlehem (House of Bread ) is located about 10 Kilometers (6 miles) southwest of Jerusalem by the hill country of Judea on the way to Hebron. It is first mentioned in the Tel al Amarna letters from the Egyptian Governor of Palestine to Pharaoh Amnehotep.

| READ MORE |
Additional DescriptionMore Details

Bethlehem plays a significant part in the Old Testament, in the history of the Israelites, both before they entered Egypt and slavery, and after the Exodus. In the Bible, it is first mentioned as “Ephrata” in connection with the death of Rachel, Jacob’s beloved wife whom he buried outside the town when she died in childbirth. The Tomb of Rachel is a pilgrimage place for Jews and Muslims alike. Among other Biblical mentions and Holy Sites in Bethlehem: Rachel’s tomb, Naomi and Ruth, Samuel anoints King David and the well from which David’s warriors brought him waters. In the bible it is called “Bethlehem of Judah” (belonging to the tribe of Judah), to distinguish it from the other Bethlehem, which was in the North in the territory of the Zebulon. This design has been painted from the inside of the glass by skilled artisan. This ancient technique is achieved by special curved brushes that are inserted from the top hole. David, the youngest son of a Bethlehem-farmer (a shepherd) is chosen and anointed by the Prophet Samuel on behalf of the Lord as a king. (First Samuel 17:12). According to Matthew 2 and Luke 2, Jesus was born in Bethlehem, and Matthew interpreted this as the fulfillment of Micah’s prophecy. In effect it became a sort of official rightful place of the family line of David. Christian tradition, perhaps as early as the second century CE, identified a cave as the site of Jesus’ birth. About 338 CE Constantine, the Roman emperor and his mother, Helena, built a church over the grotto and In 527 Justinian the Emperor of the Byzantine Empire resettled in Bethlehem, his reign was one of great prosperity and expansion of churches. The site of the Nativity is a central pilgrimage destination for Christians from all over the world. When the Muslims began their conquests out of Arabia, the Caliph Omar visited Bethlehem in 638 and out of respect for Christianity, ordered the Church of Nativity to be preserved. The central mosque on Manger Square in named after Caliph Omar. Bethlehem was a city of importance to the Crusaders, who conquered it in the year 1100. Over years of wars between the Crusaders and the Muslims the city was destroyed, and then subsequently rebuilt. The Turks destroyed the city in 1244, but the church somehow escaped, Bethlehem was rebuilt once again. When finally the Crusaders were driven from Palestine in 1291, the Muslim rulers used the holy places for political and financial ends. Although Bethlehem was still nominally endowed, collection of revenue from the land was impossible. In 1332 Pope John XXII wrote to Edward III of England, to David II of Scotland and to Simon of Meopham, Archbishop of Canterbury, asking them to help the bishop of Bethlehem to regain his interest and so enable him to return to Bethlehem and carry out repairs. Decay and destruction proceeded over the years as a result of fighting between the local Christian and Muslim residents.

Price: $30.00

Citadel of David Silk Tie

“Also he (King Hezekia) strengthened himself, and built up all the wall that was broken, and raised it up to the towers and repaired Millo in the city of David and made darts and shields in abundance” (Chronicles II 32:5)

The tie features a scene depicting the tower from a westerly view. The scene below the tower is of a grove of olive trees of some which are hundreds of years old. This impressionistic illustration helps portray the tower as a Jerusalem Icon through time. The Tower of David dominates the old city from its highest point.

| READ MORE |
Additional DescriptionMore Details

Since the second century BCE the fortress has guarded Jerusalem vulnerable northern and western approaches. Each successive ruler of the city, aware of the site’s importance, buttressed and rebuilt it, endeavoring to out do his predecessors The victory of Judah the Macabee over the successors of Alexander the Great marked the start of the Hasmonean dynasty in the second century BCE. It was a period of prosperity, reflected in large-scale construction in Jerusalem, the Kingdoms capital. The earliest structures built of impressive hewn stone, are the remnants of a wall and two towers, which probably define the city’s western limits in the Hasmonean period. On the ground of the Citadel were hundreds of arrowheads along with catapult and sling stones perhaps from the siege laid on the city in 132 CE by Antiochus IV. No one built Jerusalem more grandly than King Herod, about 150 years later. The majesty of the Western Wall is evidence of his prowess as a builder of monumental structures. His major contribution to the city’s fortifications consisted of the three magnificent towers of the Citadel, named after his brother, good friend and his wife: Phasael, Hippicus and Miriam. When Rome gave way to Byzantium, Jerusalem became a magnet for Christian pilgrims. In this period the Citadel was probably not used exclusively for military purposes; small enclosures with rough mosaic floors suggest monks, quarters. But the Byzantines, too, reinforced the Citadels walls, using the ancient stones dislodged in previous battles. In 638 CE the Arabs overran the city, ruling for the next 460 years. They built a smaller Citadel with a rounded tower, the ruins of which are still visible in the southern part of the inner courtyard.

Price: $36.00

Dan- Silk Tie- Twelve Tribes

Dan: was the fifth son of Jacob, and the first of Bilhah, who was Jacob’s concubine and the maid of Rachel, who was Jacob’s wife (Genesis 30:1-6). The name Dan means “to judge”.When Jacob blessed his sons in Genesis 49:16-18, it is stated that Dan would provide justice for his people.

| READ MORE |
Additional DescriptionMore Details

The Tribe of Dan is reprimanded in the Bible’s Song of Deborah for not participating in the war against the Canaanites(Judges 5:17. The Tribe of Dan failed to conquer the portion of the land of Israel that was given to them as their original inheritance. That failure forced the tribe to move north, where it took over the land called Laish, renaming it Dan (Joshua 19:47). That became the northern limit of Israel. King Jeroboam I built a pagan temple in the land of Dan and set up a golden calf to be worshiped (1 Kings 12:29). That tragic sin prompted the prophet Amos to include the land of Dan in his denouncement of pagan worshipers, that they shall fall and never rise again (Amos 8:14). “Now these are the names of the sons of Israel, who came into Egypt with Jacob; every man came with his household: Reuben, Simeon, Levi, and Judah; Issachar, Zebulun, and Benjamin; Dan and Naphtali, Gad and Asher. And all the souls that came out of the loins of Jacob were seventy souls; and Joseph was in Egypt already”. (Exodus 1, verses 1-5) In the Bible, the Israelites are described as descendents of the twelve sons of Jacob whose name was changed to Israel in Genesis 32:28. The Bible contains about two dozen listings of the twelve sons of Jacob and/or tribes of Israel. Some of these are in very brief lists, while others are spread out over several paragraphs or chapters that discuss the distribution of the land or name certain representatives of each tribe, one after another. Once the Israelites completed the conquest of the land of Canaan during the days of Joshua, the twelve tribes split up to their assigned territory. For many years, each tribe was ruled by a series of Judges. At times enemies had to be fought but not all the tribes were united in battle. The tribes hoped to be united as the other nation through leadership of a king. The prophet Samuel, names Saul, of the tribe of Benjamin, to be the first king of Israel. After Sauls Short reign Samuel anoints David of the tribe of Judah. Israel was again united under King David, and followed so during the reign of his son King Solomon. Solomon’s son, Reheboam however saw the split of Israel in two- 10 northern tribes making the kingdom of Israel (aka Northern Kingdom) and the other being the Kingdom of Judah, comprised of the tribes of Judah and Benjamin. When the Assyrian captured the Northern kingdom (tribes) around 720 BCE they disbursed the Israelites among many lands. When the Babylonian captured the Judean kingdom around 680 BCE the tribes of Judah and Benjamin held on to their identity as Judeans. It is said that all Jews descend from these two remaining tribes.

Price: $36.00

Pages: 1 2 3 4 5Next >Last »