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Church of Holy Sepulchre Ornament

A sepulchre is a burial chamber. In ancient Hebrew practice, it was carved into the rock of a hillside. It is first mentioned as purchased by Abraham for Sarah from Ephron the Hittite (Gen. 23:20). This was the “cave of the field of Machpelah,” where also Abraham and Rebekah and Jacob and Leah were buried (79:29-32). In Acts 7:16 it is said that Jacob was “laid in the sepulchre that Abraham bought for a sum of money of the sons of Emmor the father of Sychem.”

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The term sepulchre is most often used for the sepulchral burial site of Jesus in Jerusalem, over which the Church of the Holy Sepulchre has been erected. The Church is the holiest Christian site in Jerusalem and Israel. The Church contains the Chapel of Golgotha and three Stations of the Cross, as well as the place of Jesus Christ’s burial and resurrection. The church stands in the place where a temple dedicated to Aphrodite used to stand. This temple was built during the Roman Empire’s time on the location where Christ was crucified and buried, so it will be forgotten. Ironically, the building of the temple actually preserved the exact burial site’s location. This design has been painted from the inside of the glass by skilled artisan. This ancient technique is achieved by special curved brushes that are inserted from the top hole. The Church of the Holy Sepulchre was built by Constantine I the Great during the fourth century, after he became Christian, and turned Christianity to the official religion of the Roman Empire. In the year 326, Constantine I sent his mother, Helena, to seek the Crucifixion location in Jerusalem. Helena found the place and also found the remains of the cross itself. In that same place, 7 years later, Constantine I founded the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in the year 333.At the time of the Persian occupation of Jerusalem in the year of 614, most of the church’s structure was ruined. The church was built again in a more limited composition, but during the 11th century was facing demolition again by the hands of the Calif Al-Hakim bi-Amr Allah. This danger initiated the crusades, whose call was to return the Church of the Holy Sepulchre and Jerusalem to Christian hands. When the crusaders occupied Jerusalem in 1099, they rebuilt the church. After Jerusalem’s occupation by the hands of Salah A-Din in the year of 1187, The Church Holy Sepulchre was given for safe keeping to two Moslem families, the Nusseibeh and the Joudeh families, who own the place today, and currently hold the keys to the church. The place where Jesus Christ was crucified is named Golgotha (the place of the skull). This hill is situated inside the structure of the church. Actually, it looks like this hill is named so because of its form, the reminding of a person’s skull. Other traditions tied to this place say that this is the burial site of the first man, and is also the place where the binding of Isaac by Abraham occurred. Nowadays, there is a chapel on this hill, where tradition points to the exact place where Christ’s cross was placed. After Christ was taken down from the cross, Joseph of Arimathea buried him in a tomb that Joseph had donated. When the church was built on that spot 300 years later, the hill around the tomb was removed, so only a small structure remains, on a flat surface. A rotunda was built around the tomb’s structure, with a large dome.

Price: $30.00

Hi Ne Ma Tov Friendship pottery candle holder.

“Behold, how good and how pleasant it is for brethren to dwell together in harmony” The text from Psalm 133 helps us reflect and recall the goodness friendship gives us. Friends are there for us to share with in all occasions.

 

 

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This circle shows friends coming together around a camp fire holding supporting one another and being as one. The feet are in the midst of dance where the bodies rely on one another for support and at the same time are supporting the people on both sides. Tradition is filled with stories and laws that explain how a person should acquire friends and also how to treat other people the way we want to be treated. Tradition teaches that people like to be surrounded by friends. This circle helps remind you of the good fortune you have and receive from the friendships which are built and cherished. When we dance we can be swept off our feet or we can be rooted to the ground. Our friendships take us on amazing explorations and lift us to new heights and keep us focused on the more basic and important values we cherish. The ability to control fire is one of the major developments in the cultural history of man. Fire serves not only as a source of heat, but also of light and protection. Special vessels were constructed out of pottery to hold and cherish this source. Our collection of pottery candles shares both the warmth of the fire through friendship circles and hope for peace.

Price: $20.00

King Tutankhamun Burial Chamber Wall Ornament

This design is taken from the wall behind the casket around King Tut’s mummy in the burial chamber itself. Only the burial chamber received decorations. On the west wall are scenes depicting the apes of the first hour of the Amduat the Book of the Secret Chamber. In this book the dead pharaoh travels through the underworld to the afterlife in his solar boat.

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On the south wall the king is followed by Anubis as he appears before Hathor. Here, there is also a scene of the King being welcomed into the underworld by Hathor, Anubis and Isis. The north wall depicts the King before Nut with the royal ka embracing Osiris. On the same wall, we also find the scene of Ay performing the opening of the Mouth ritual before the mummy of Tutankhamen. In this case the person performing this duty is Ay, who became the next pharaoh The ritual allowed the mummy, to eat, breathe, see, hear and enjoy the offerings and provisions performed by the priests and officiates, thus to sustain the ka. On the east wall, Tut’s mummy is depicted being pulled on a sledge during the funeral procession. Within the procession are two viziers to the king, and a third person who might be Horemheb. This design has been painted from the inside of the glass by skilled artisan. This ancient technique is achieved by special curved brushes that are inserted from the top hole. Egypt is our window to humanity’s distant past and in understanding its history, we find mankind’s greatest glories and achievements, as well as his often repeated mistakes. We may follow along with the building of empires, only to see them collapse again and again. We find great men and rulers of renowned, but we often also see their ultimate demise. We learn about religion, its evolution and, as the world grows older, its replacement with newer religions. Yet, the ancient Egyptian religion has never really completely died out. Even today, many Egyptians continue customs, including some aspects of religion, held over from thousands of years ago. In fact, throughout the world, aspects of the ancient Egyptian religion, particularly funerary, continue to make an impact on our modern lives. The designs of the neckwear are based on elements found on the coffins of king Tutankhamen. There is probably no more famous group of artifacts in the world then those associated with the discovery of young King Tutankhamen’s tomb. Tutankhamen died as young as 16 or 17 years of age. He was probably a son of King Akhenaton by one of his secondary wives. His wife Ankhesenamun was daughter of Akhenaton and Nefertiti. Tutankhamen came to the throne as a young child and ruled for about nine years under the regency of Vizier Ay and the strong influence of the army commander Horemheb. The main events of his reign were to move the capital of Egypt back from El-Amarna to Memphis and to begin the transition from the monotheistic cult of Aton created by Akhenaton back to the polytheistic religion of Egypt with Amun-Ra again as the main God.

Price: $30.00

Pottery oil lamp

In the modern world, there is not a great deal of difference between day and night; darkness is merely a temporary nuisance, easily vanquished by touching a switch. In ancient times, however, darkness was not as easily overcome. Accordingly, the oil lamp was one of the most important household appliances in antiquity.

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For over three millennia, it lit the homes, temples, synagogues, and churches of the Holy Land. The ability to control fire is one of the major developments in the cultural history of man.Fire serves not only as a source of heat, but also of light and protection. Special vessels were constructed out of pottery to hold and cherish this source. Our collection of pottery and glass candles and ornaments share both the warmth of the fire through friendship circles and hope for peace. According to Jewish tradition (Tosefta, Ketubot 5:8), it is one of the items that a husband is obliged to provide for his wife. An individual who lacked a lamp was in dire straits: The oil lamp’s light was a symbol of life, in both ancient and modern times. “The human soul is the lamp of the Lord,” (Proverbs. 20:27).“Lord, You are my lamp, my God lights up my darkness,” (2 Sam. 22:29). The first known lamps from the Middle Bronze Age were simple wheel-made bowls, with four slight pinches (tongues) at the top to hold four wicks. Lamps from the Bronze Ages and Iron Age had only one pinch for the wick. In the Hellenistic period (333-168 BCE), the Greeks introduced the closed oil lamp, which was distinguished by its two separate compartments: the oil reservoir, constituting the major part of the lamp, and the chamber into which the wick was inserted. This period also marked the beginning of the manufacturing of mold-made decorated lamps. The kindling of lights on Hanukka is associated with the miracle of the jar of oil used to light the Temple menorah, which was composed of oil lamps. The menorah of the Tabernacle depicted in the Book of Exodus (25:31-40; 37:17-24) consisted of a central shaft from which three branches issued on either side, at three junctions called kaftorim (“calyxes”). Each branch ended in a perah (“flower”), in which an oil lamp rested. These, then, were separate lamps, and not a single lamp with multiple mouths; they also were distinct from the body of the menorah itself, and apparently were made of gold, as was the body of the menorah.

Price: $20.00

Qumran and The Dead Sea Scrolls Ornament

This design depicts the desert surroundings of the community of Qumran. In the foreground are the cliffs and  cave where the scrolls were found. The pottery jar which held the scrolls with some of the aged pieces of parchments found.

This design has been painted from the inside of the glass by skilled artisan. This ancient technique is achieved by special curved brushes that are inserted from the top hole.

 

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The origins of the Qumran communities are believed to be of Essenes, the pious anti-Hellenistic circles formed in the early days of the Maccabees. The tie feature parts of the scrolls found in Qumran with other vessels found at the excavations. In 1947, a Bedouin shepherd boy accidentally stumbled upon one of the century’s greatest finds in a dark cave in the Judean desert. He sold three of the seven scrolls to an antiquities dealer in Bethlehem, who in turn sold them to the archaeologist Prof Sukenik of the Hebrew University. Over the years, thousands more fragments of parchment, some papyrus and some leather, were found and pieced together into 80 documents. Since 1965, the scrolls have been on display at the Israel Museum in the Shrine of the Book. The pieces of parchment were well-preserved by the dry desert climate of the region. The Dead Sea Scrolls represent a turning point in Jewish history. They reveal the link between Biblical Israel and the Jewish culture of the Talmudic period. They are the oldest known copy of the Old Testament. Scholar’s opinion regarding the time span and background of the Dead Sea Scrolls is anchored in historical, paleographic, and linguistic evidence, corroborated firmly by carbon 14-datings. Some manuscripts were written and copied in the third century B.C.E., but the bulk of the material, particularly the texts that reflect on a sectarian community, are originals or copies from the first century B.C.E.; a number of texts date from as late as the years preceding the destruction of the site in 68 C.E. at the hands of the Roman legions. The origins of the Qumran communities are believed to be of Essenes, the pious anti-Hellenistic circles formed in the early days of the Maccabees. who were concerned about growing Hellenization and strove to abide by the Torah. Archeological and historical evidence indicates that Qumran abandoned about the time of the Roman incursion of 68 C.E., two years before the collapse of Jewish self-government in Judea and the destruction of the Temple in Jerusalem in 70 C.E. The Essenes persisted in a separatist existence through two centuries, occupying themselves with study and a communal way of life that included worship, prayer, and work. Many of the non-Old Testament scrolls contain details about the Essene sect and their values. One of the scrolls tells the story of the battle between the “sons of light and the sons of darkness” and echoes the struggle between good and evil. The Essenes included celibate men, a phenomenon rarely found in Judaism, and their influence on the early Christians is unquestionable, making the scrolls of immense interest to Christian, as well as Jewish scholars. Undoubtedly these ancient manuscripts will remain a witness to Jewish continuity and a source of knowledge regarding the roots of Christianity for centuries to come.

Price: $30.00

Shabbat – Silk tie

“Six days you shall work, and the seventh day is Shabbat, for the Lord your God” (Deuteronomy 5:13).

The start of the Sabbath (Shabbat) begins with the lighting of candles, blessing the wine and bread. The theme of an important day of rest.

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Shabbat is primarily a day of rest and spiritual enrichment. The word “Shabbat” comes from the root Shin-Bet-Tav, meaning to cease, to end, or to rest. Wherever Jews have lived, they have observed Sabbath. For the most part, other nations had no real Sabbath equivalent. The weekly day of rest has no parallel in any other ancient civilization. In ancient times, leisure was for the wealthy and the ruling classes only, never for the serving or laboring classes. In addition, the very idea of rest each week was unimaginable. The ancient Babylonians had a day of rest called Shappatu, but it was observed once a month on a full moon and considered unlucky. We take the five-day workweek so much for granted that we forget what a radical concept a day of rest was in ancient times. The Greeks thought Jews were lazy because they insisted on having a “holiday” every seventh day. To keep the Sabbath, Jews risked their wealth and sometimes their lives to keep the Sabbath holy. Like other Jewish festivals, Shabbat was linked to the temple service through an additional sacrificial offering and the displaying of twelve loaves of bread. Before the destruction of the second temple in 70 CE, the Sabbath sacrifices had been expanded together with an evolving body of Sabbath laws. After the destruction of the second temple, the synagogue and the Jewish home, not the temple, became the focal point of every Jewish community, especially each Sabbath. During the Talmudic and Gaonic periods, the Sabbath liturgy grew and expanded, and the Torah instruction centering on the scriptural readings became formalized. By the end of the Gaonic period, the essential structure of the Sabbath prayers were set and like the liturgy of the weekday service, were ready for publication and use by each and every Jew. Soon, an entire tractate of the Talmud evolved that was devoted to the laws and spirit of the Sabbath. Now, prayers and symbolic acts replaced the Holy Temple services, which could no longer be performed. Synagogue services and traditional Jewish home life became a constant reminder to Jews everywhere of what was lost and the traditions which will be reinstated with the coming of the Messiah and the eventual rebuilding of the Temple. Lighting Sabbath candles originates in the mishnah, the codification of our oral laws. When candles eventually replaced the oil lamp, it became custom to have at least two lights, representing the commandments of Remember- zachor (Exodus 20:8) and Keep- shamor (Deuteronomy 5:12). However, in many homes, the custom is to light a candle for each member of the family. The kiddush is said over wine as a reminder that everything in our world has holy and unholy potential. Wine can be misused and cause irresponsible behavior, or it can be elevated to the holy by using it to sanctify G-d’s name. Two covered, braided or twisted loaves of challah, a traditional Jewish bread, are used at each of the Sabbath’s shalosh seudot, three festive meals, eaten every Sabbath. Meals require two loaves of bread in remembrance of the double portion of manna G-d caused to rain down every Friday during the Israelites journey through the desert. The Jews were able to collect enough bread to last through Shabbat, when no manna fell. It is a popular custom to invite guests for Sabbath meals. Not only does it add to the enjoyment of the day, it is a way to reach out to Jews less familiar with how a traditional Jewish family celebrates and honors the Sabbath. Invitations may be spontaneous or made in advance.

Price: $36.00

The Holy City Jerusalem Ornament

The design has been painted from the inside of the glass by skilled artisans. This ancient technique is achieved by special curved brushes that are inserted from the top hole. This design depicts the Temple mount which is a holy site to Muslims, Jews and Christians alike.

Jerusalem is a city rich in history, tradition and culture references to the city of Jerusalem appear throughout time. Through the ages it has been called by many names: Salem, Mount Moriah, Adonai Urah, Jebus, Jerusalem, Zion, the City of David, and Ariel (Lion of God). God has declared that this is the place He will establish His Name and will dwell there forever (1 Kings 9).

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The history of Jerusalem begins when Abraham meets, king of Salem – around 2110 BCE (Genesis 14) after he had captured Abraham’s nephew, Lot. Several years later, following a command from God, Abraham took Isaac, his only son, to Mount Moriah to offer him as a sacrifice to God. Abraham called that place of sacrifice, “The Place Where God Will Be Seen” since God provided a sacrifice in place of Isaac. Among the early records referring to Jerusalem are Egyptian tablets dating from about 1400 BCE that name the city Urusa. Around 1405 BCE, “The sons of Judah fought against Jerusalem and captured it” (Judges 1:8). David conquered Jerusalem by defeating the Jebusites in 1052 BCE and built Jerusalem into a great city. David wanted to build a house for God, but because of the blood on David’s hands, God did not allow him to build the house David greatly expanded the Kingdom of Israel and made Jerusalem its capital. After David’s death, Solomon, his son and successor, built a city wall and many buildings on a scale of magnificence previously unknown in Israel. When it was completed, the Glory of God filled the Temple. However, because Solomon went after other gods due to the influence of his pagan wives, Solomon’s Temple was destroyed and the Jews exiled by the Babylonians in the year 586 BCE. In 539 BCE, the Persians, who allowed the Jews to return to Jerusalem the following year, conquered Babylonia. The construction of a new temple was then undertaken on the ruins of the old. Alexander the Great in 333 BCE captured Jerusalem, and after his death it came under the rule of the Syrian ruler Antiochus IV who attempted to wipe out the Jewish religion by destroying a large part of Jerusalem. This caused a Jewish revolt under the leadership of Judas Maccabeus, a member of a priestly ruling family, the Hasmonaeans He liberated Jerusalem from the Syrians in 165 BCE and later extended Hasmonaean rule over a large part of Judea. Jerusalem became the destination of annual Jewish pilgrimage from the outlying area, since certain religious obligations could only be fulfilled in the temple. All Jewish sacred and secular law and power came to be concentrated in the city. In 37 BCE the Roman governor Herod became king of Judea. Herod rebuilt the temple, and enhanced other elements of the city. The retaining wall built by Herod for the Temple Mount stands today as the Western Wall. In 70 CE, Titus, son of the Roman emperor Vespasian, captured the city, destroyed the Temple, except for the Western Wall. The city suffered almost complete destruction during the Jewish rebellion (132-135) led by Simon Bar Kokhba, following which the Jews were banished from the city. The Roman emperor Hadrian, rebuilt the city as a pagan city, and changed its name to Aelia Capitolina. Under Roman rule, the city became a destination for Christian pilgrimage, and the Church of the Holy Sepulchre was built during the reign of Constantine the Great (303-337). Roman support for churches and religious figures gave the city an increasingly Christian aspect. In 638, the city came under Muslim control following conquest by Caliph Umar I. The Dome of the Rock and the Al Aqsa Mosque were soon constructed on the Temple Mount, with the Dome of the Rock standing on the site of the First and Second Temples. The Seljuks, a Turkish dynasty, ruled Jerusalem harshly in the 11th century and continued to expand, especially toward Europe. In response to this expansion and Turkish control of places sacred to Christianity, Pope Urban II called the first of the Crusades, asking Christians to travel to the Middle East and fight to reclaim the Holy Land, especially Jerusalem. Jerusalem fell to the Crusaders under Godfrey of Bouillon in 1099. The Crusaders slaughtered many of the Muslim and Jewish residents and ruled with great cruelty until Salahadin captured the city again for the Muslims in 1187. In 1517 the Ottomans, who ruled it until the 20th century, took Jerusalem. As the population grew, there was increased pressure on the housing capacity of the Old City. Jews began to build neighborhoods outside the Old City’s walls, and nearby Arab villages expanded.

Price: $30.00

The Holy City Jerusalem tea candle holder

Jerusalem is a city rich in history, tradition and culture references to the city of Jerusalem appear throughout time. Through the ages it has been called by many names: Salem, Mount Moriah, Adonai Urah, Jebus, Jerusalem, Zion, the City of David, and Ariel (Lion of God). God has declared that this is the place He will establish His Name and will dwell there forever (1 Kings 9). This design depicts the Temple mount which is a holy site to Muslims, Jews and Christians alike. The design has been painted from the inside of the glass by skilled artisans.

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The history of Jerusalem begins when Abraham meets, king of Salem – around 2110 BCE (Genesis 14) after he had captured Abraham’s nephew, Lot. Several years later, following a command from God, Abraham took Isaac, his only son, to Mount Moriah to offer him as a sacrifice to God. Abraham called that place of sacrifice, “The Place Where God Will Be Seen” since God provided a sacrifice in place of Isaac. Among the early records referring to Jerusalem are Egyptian tablets dating from about 1400 BCE that name the city Urusa. Around 1405 BCE, “The sons of Judah fought against Jerusalem and captured it” (Judges 1:8). David conquered Jerusalem by defeating the Jebusites in 1052 BCE and built Jerusalem into a great city. David wanted to build a house for God, but because of the blood on David’s hands, God did not allow him to build the house David greatly expanded the Kingdom of Israel and made Jerusalem its capital. After David’s death, Solomon, his son and successor, built a city wall and many buildings on a scale of magnificence previously unknown in Israel. When it was completed, the Glory of God filled the Temple. However, because Solomon went after other gods due to the influence of his pagan wives, Solomon’s Temple was destroyed and the Jews exiled by the Babylonians in the year 586 BCE. In 539 BCE, the Persians, who allowed the Jews to return to Jerusalem the following year, conquered Babylonia. The construction of a new temple was then undertaken on the ruins of the old. Alexander the Great in 333 BCE captured Jerusalem, and after his death it came under the rule of the Syrian ruler Antiochus IV who attempted to wipe out the Jewish religion by destroying a large part of Jerusalem. This caused a Jewish revolt under the leadership of Judas Maccabeus, a member of a priestly ruling family, the Hasmonaeans He liberated Jerusalem from the Syrians in 165 BCE and later extended Hasmonaean rule over a large part of Judea. Jerusalem became the destination of annual Jewish pilgrimage from the outlying area, since certain religious obligations could only be fulfilled in the temple. All Jewish sacred and secular law and power came to be concentrated in the city. In 37 BCE the Roman governor Herod became king of Judea. Herod rebuilt the temple, and enhanced other elements of the city. The retaining wall built by Herod for the Temple Mount stands today as the Western Wall. In 70 CE, Titus, son of the Roman emperor Vespasian, captured the city, destroyed the Temple, except for the Western Wall. The city suffered almost complete destruction during the Jewish rebellion (132-135) led by Simon Bar Kokhba, following which the Jews were banished from the city. The Roman emperor Hadrian, rebuilt the city as a pagan city, and changed its name to Aelia Capitolina. Under Roman rule, the city became a destination for Christian pilgrimage, and the Church of the Holy Sepulchre was built during the reign of Constantine the Great (303-337). Roman support for churches and religious figures gave the city an increasingly Christian aspect. In 638, the city came under Muslim control following conquest by Caliph Umar I. The Dome of the Rock and the Al Aqsa Mosque were soon constructed on the Temple Mount, with the Dome of the Rock standing on the site of the First and Second Temples. The Seljuks, a Turkish dynasty, ruled Jerusalem harshly in the 11th century and continued to expand, especially toward Europe. In response to this expansion and Turkish control of places sacred to Christianity, Pope Urban II called the first of the Crusades, asking Christians to travel to the Middle East and fight to reclaim the Holy Land, especially Jerusalem. Jerusalem fell to the Crusaders under Godfrey of Bouillon in 1099. The Crusaders slaughtered many of the Muslim and Jewish residents and ruled with great cruelty until Salahadin captured the city again for the Muslims in 1187. In 1517 the Ottomans, who ruled it until the 20th century, took Jerusalem. As the population grew, there was increased pressure on the housing capacity of the Old City. Jews began to build neighborhoods outside the Old City’s walls, and nearby Arab villages expanded.

Price: $30.00