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King Tutankhamun Burial Chamber Wall Ornament

This design is taken from the wall behind the casket around King Tut’s mummy in the burial chamber itself. Only the burial chamber received decorations. On the west wall are scenes depicting the apes of the first hour of the Amduat the Book of the Secret Chamber. In this book the dead pharaoh travels through the underworld to the afterlife in his solar boat.

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On the south wall the king is followed by Anubis as he appears before Hathor. Here, there is also a scene of the King being welcomed into the underworld by Hathor, Anubis and Isis. The north wall depicts the King before Nut with the royal ka embracing Osiris. On the same wall, we also find the scene of Ay performing the opening of the Mouth ritual before the mummy of Tutankhamen. In this case the person performing this duty is Ay, who became the next pharaoh The ritual allowed the mummy, to eat, breathe, see, hear and enjoy the offerings and provisions performed by the priests and officiates, thus to sustain the ka. On the east wall, Tut’s mummy is depicted being pulled on a sledge during the funeral procession. Within the procession are two viziers to the king, and a third person who might be Horemheb. This design has been painted from the inside of the glass by skilled artisan. This ancient technique is achieved by special curved brushes that are inserted from the top hole. Egypt is our window to humanity’s distant past and in understanding its history, we find mankind’s greatest glories and achievements, as well as his often repeated mistakes. We may follow along with the building of empires, only to see them collapse again and again. We find great men and rulers of renowned, but we often also see their ultimate demise. We learn about religion, its evolution and, as the world grows older, its replacement with newer religions. Yet, the ancient Egyptian religion has never really completely died out. Even today, many Egyptians continue customs, including some aspects of religion, held over from thousands of years ago. In fact, throughout the world, aspects of the ancient Egyptian religion, particularly funerary, continue to make an impact on our modern lives. The designs of the neckwear are based on elements found on the coffins of king Tutankhamen. There is probably no more famous group of artifacts in the world then those associated with the discovery of young King Tutankhamen’s tomb. Tutankhamen died as young as 16 or 17 years of age. He was probably a son of King Akhenaton by one of his secondary wives. His wife Ankhesenamun was daughter of Akhenaton and Nefertiti. Tutankhamen came to the throne as a young child and ruled for about nine years under the regency of Vizier Ay and the strong influence of the army commander Horemheb. The main events of his reign were to move the capital of Egypt back from El-Amarna to Memphis and to begin the transition from the monotheistic cult of Aton created by Akhenaton back to the polytheistic religion of Egypt with Amun-Ra again as the main God.

Price: $30.00

King Tutankhamun Cartouche – Woven Silk Tie Blue

This design is taken from the Golden Bands that were around King Tut Mummy. The bands were made of beaten gold plaques which were inscribed with religious texts. The cartouche reads: Tutankhamun, Ruler of Heliopolis tut-ankh-amun heka iunu. The top three signs: the feather, the block sign with the extending lines, and the wavy line make up the word Amun.

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The next group, from left to right are the sign meaning life, ankh, the two small half circles are phonetic signs pronounced “t” and the bird sounds like w or u. The crook sign means ruler. The other two signs on the bottom row of the cartouche mean Heliopolis shema, or Southern Heliopolis, by which is meant Thebes, the southern capital of Egypt. Egypt is our window to humanity’s distant past and in understanding its history, we find mankind’s greatest glories and achievements, as well as his often repeated mistakes. We may follow along with the building of empires, only to see them collapse again and again. We find great men and rulers of renowned, but we often also see their ultimate demise. We learn about religion, its evolution and, as the world grows older, its replacement with newer religions. Yet, the ancient Egyptian religion has never really completely died out. Even today, many Egyptians continue customs, including some aspects of religion, held over from thousands of years ago. In fact, throughout the world, aspects of the ancient Egyptian religion, particularly funerary, continue to make an impact on our modern lives. The designs of the neckwear are based on elements found on the coffins of king Tutankhamen. There is probably no more famous group of artifacts in the world then those associated with the discovery of young King Tutankhamen’s tomb. Tutankhamen died as young as 16 or 17 years of age. He was probably a son of King Akhenaton by one of his secondary wives. His wife Ankhesenamun was daughter of Akhenaton and Nefertiti. Tutankhamen came to the throne as a young child and ruled for about nine years under the regency of Vizier Ay and the strong influence of the army commander Horemheb. The main events of his reign were to move the capital of Egypt back from El-Amarna to Memphis and to begin the transition from the monotheistic cult of Aton created by Akhenaton back to the polytheistic religion of Egypt with Amun-Ra again as the main God.

Price: $36.00

King Tutankhamun Cartouche – Woven Silk Tie Brown

This design is taken from the Golden Bands that were around King Tut Mummy. The bands were made of beaten gold plaques which were inscribed with religious texts. The cartouche reads: Tutankhamun, Ruler of Heliopolis tut-ankh-amun heka iunu. The top three signs: the feather, the block sign with the extending lines, and the wavy line make up the word Amun.

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Additional DescriptionMore Details

The next group, from left to right are the sign meaning life, ankh, the two small half circles are phonetic signs pronounced “t” and the bird sounds like w or u. The crook sign means ruler. The other two signs on the bottom row of the cartouche mean Heliopolis shema, or Southern Heliopolis, by which is meant Thebes, the southern capital of Egypt. Egypt is our window to humanity’s distant past and in understanding its history, we find mankind’s greatest glories and achievements, as well as his often repeated mistakes. We may follow along with the building of empires, only to see them collapse again and again. We find great men and rulers of renowned, but we often also see their ultimate demise. We learn about religion, its evolution and, as the world grows older, its replacement with newer religions. Yet, the ancient Egyptian religion has never really completely died out. Even today, many Egyptians continue customs, including some aspects of religion, held over from thousands of years ago. In fact, throughout the world, aspects of the ancient Egyptian religion, particularly funerary, continue to make an impact on our modern lives. The designs of the neckwear are based on elements found on the coffins of king Tutankhamen. There is probably no more famous group of artifacts in the world then those associated with the discovery of young King Tutankhamen’s tomb. Tutankhamen died as young as 16 or 17 years of age. He was probably a son of King Akhenaton by one of his secondary wives. His wife Ankhesenamun was daughter of Akhenaton and Nefertiti. Tutankhamen came to the throne as a young child and ruled for about nine years under the regency of Vizier Ay and the strong influence of the army commander Horemheb. The main events of his reign were to move the capital of Egypt back from El-Amarna to Memphis and to begin the transition from the monotheistic cult of Aton created by Akhenaton back to the polytheistic religion of Egypt with Amun-Ra again as the main God.

Price: $36.00

King Tutankhamun Cartouche – Silk Tie

This design is taken from the Golden Bands that were around King Tut Mummy. The bands were made of beaten gold plaques which were inscribed with religious texts. The cartouche reads: Tutankhamon, Ruler of Heliopolis tut-ankh-amun heka iunu. The top three signs: the feather, the block sign with the extending lines, and the wavy line make up the word Amun.

 

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The next group, from left to right are the sign meaning life, ankh, the two small half circles are phonetic signs pronounced “t” and the bird sounds like w or u. The crook sign means ruler. The other two signs on the bottom row of the cartouche mean Heliopolis shema, or Southern Heliopolis, by which is meant Thebes, the southern capital of Egypt. Egypt is our window to humanity’s distant past and in understanding its history, we find mankind’s greatest glories and achievements, as well as his often repeated mistakes. We may follow along with the building of empires, only to see them collapse again and again. We find great men and rulers of renowned, but we often also see their ultimate demise. We learn about religion, its evolution and, as the world grows older, its replacement with newer religions. Yet, the ancient Egyptian religion has never really completely died out. Even today, many Egyptians continue customs, including some aspects of religion, held over from thousands of years ago. In fact, throughout the world, aspects of the ancient Egyptian religion, particularly funerary, continue to make an impact on our modern lives. The designs of the neckwear are based on elements found on the coffins of king Tutankhamen. There is probably no more famous group of artifacts in the world then those associated with the discovery of young King Tutankhamen’s tomb. Tutankhamen died as young as 16 or 17 years of age. He was probably a son of King Akhenaton by one of his secondary wives. His wife Ankhesenamun was daughter of Akhenaton and Nefertiti. Tutankhamen came to the throne as a young child and ruled for about nine years under the regency of Vizier Ay and the strong influence of the army commander Horemheb. The main events of his reign were to move the capital of Egypt back from El-Amarna to Memphis and to begin the transition from the monotheistic cult of Aton created by Akhenaton back to the polytheistic religion of Egypt with Amun-Ra again as the main God.

Price: $36.00

King Tutankhamun Falcon Feather and Golden Band Scarf

Scarves are no longer simply a square or long narrow strip of material worn for warmth round the neck or tied round the head. Covering the head had religious connotations among the Hindus, Jews, Christians, Parsis and Muslims. For many years Indian sari-pallav or the dupatta or odhani has served this purpose.

 

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But scarves have left behind the peasant-inspired look and have crashed onto the beaches, in colleges, evening out, day-time casual wear and the fashion magazines. They are in vogue and, along with bags, shoes, belts and jewelry, have become the accessories of the moment. Our designs have a blend of contemporary elements with the feel of the ancient designs relating untold tales. This design is taken from the Golden Bands that were around King Tut Mummy. The bands were made of beaten gold plaques which were inscribed with religious texts. The cartouche reads: Tutankhamon, Ruler of Heliopolis tut-ankh-amun heka iunu. Under the kings hands on the coffin the goddesses Nekhbet and Wadjet, spread their wings protectively around the upper part of the royal body. Each of them grasp in their talons the hieroglyphic sign for “infinity”. Under the kings hands on the coffin the goddesses Nekhbet and Wadjet, spread their wings protectively around the upper part of the royal body. Osiris were routinely added to the decoration of the coffin walls in order to provide a ring of protection around the king. Egypt is our window to humanity’s distant past and in understanding its history, we find mankind’s greatest glories and achievements, as well as his often repeated mistakes. We may follow along with the building of empires, only to see them collapse again and again. We find great men and rulers of renowned, but we often also see their ultimate demise. We learn about religion, its evolution and, as the world grows older, its replacement with newer religions. Yet, the ancient Egyptian religion has never really completely died out. Even today, many Egyptians continue customs, including some aspects of religion, held over from thousands of years ago. In fact, throughout the world, aspects of the ancient Egyptian religion, particularly funerary, continue to make an impact on our modern lives. The designs of the neckwear are based on elements found on the coffins of king Tutankhamen. There is probably no more famous group of artifacts in the world then those associated with the discovery of young King Tutankhamen’s tomb. Tutankhamen died as young as 16 or 17 years of age. He was probably a son of King Akhenaton by one of his secondary wives. His wife Ankhesenamun was daughter of Akhenaton and Nefertiti. Tutankhamen came to the throne as a young child and ruled for about nine years under the regency of Vizier Ay and the strong influence of the army commander Horemheb. The main events of his reign were to move the capital of Egypt back from El-Amarna to Memphis and to begin the transition from the monotheistic cult of Aton created by Akhenaton back to the polytheistic religion of Egypt with Amun-Ra again as the main God.

Price: $45.00

King Tutankhamun Protecting Wings – Silk Tie

This design is taken from the coffins of King Tut. Under the kings hands on the coffin the goddesses Nekhbet and Wadjet, spread their wings protectively around the upper part of the royal body. Each of them grasp in their talons the hieroglyphic sign for “infinity”.

In addition the figures of the goddesses Isis and Nephthys, the four sons of Horus and other deities connected with Osiris were routinely added to the decoration of the coffin walls in order to provide a ring of protection around the king.

 

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Egypt is our window to humanity’s distant past and in understanding its history, we find mankind’s greatest glories and achievements, as well as his often repeated mistakes. We may follow along with the building of empires, only to see them collapse again and again. We find great men and rulers of renowned, but we often also see their ultimate demise. We learn about religion, its evolution and, as the world grows older, its replacement with newer religions. Yet, the ancient Egyptian religion has never really completely died out. Even today, many Egyptians continue customs, including some aspects of religion, held over from thousands of years ago. In fact, throughout the world, aspects of the ancient Egyptian religion, particularly funerary, continue to make an impact on our modern lives. The designs of the neckwear are based on elements found on the coffins of king Tutankhamen. There is probably no more famous group of artifacts in the world then those associated with the discovery of young King Tutankhamen’s tomb. Tutankhamen died as young as 16 or 17 years of age. He was probably a son of King Akhenaton by one of his secondary wives. His wife Ankhesenamun was daughter of Akhenaton and Nefertiti. Tutankhamen came to the throne as a young child and ruled for about nine years under the regency of Vizier Ay and the strong influence of the army commander Horemheb. The main events of his reign were to move the capital of Egypt back from El-Amarna to Memphis and to begin the transition from the monotheistic cult of Aton created by Akhenaton back to the polytheistic religion of Egypt with Amun-Ra again as the main God.

Price: $36.00

King Tutankhamun War Chest Chariot Ornament

This design is taken from the wooden war chest which was found in the Antechamber of Tut’s tomb. It is one of the most intricately decorated objects in the tomb. Fierce confrontations take place on both sides of the chest. King Tut is depicted in his chariot trampling Hittites on one side and Nubians on the other. Both his horses leap forward, rearing on hind legs, wild eyed, crushing the enemy. Plumed headdresses rise from caps on the crests of the horses’ necks.

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The king drives his chariot with the reins tied around his waist, so that he may free his hands to draw his bow. Immediately following the king’s chariot, three fan bearers shield the king from the sun with feather fans on tall poles. Additional Egyptian soldiers help to fight the enemy. This design has been painted from the inside of the glass by skilled artisan. This ancient technique is achieved by special curved brushes that are inserted from the top hole. The enemy is frequently depicted as a confused mass. Chaos and disorder were considered disgraceful to the ancient Egyptian, since they represented the opposites of the balance and harmony upon which their entire culture was based. This is why scholars believe that the artists who composed the military reliefs for the pharaohs incorporated significant symbolism. Egypt is our window to humanity’s distant past and in understanding its history, we find mankind’s greatest glories and achievements, as well as his often repeated mistakes. We may follow along with the building of empires, only to see them collapse again and again. We find great men and rulers of renowned, but we often also see their ultimate demise. We learn about religion, its evolution and, as the world grows older, its replacement with newer religions. Yet, the ancient Egyptian religion has never really completely died out. Even today, many Egyptians continue customs, including some aspects of religion, held over from thousands of years ago. In fact, throughout the world, aspects of the ancient Egyptian religion, particularly funerary, continue to make an impact on our modern lives. There is probably no more famous group of artifacts in the world then those associated with the discovery of young King Tutankhamen’s tomb. Tutankhamen died as young as 16 or 17 years of age. He was probably a son of King Akhenaton by one of his secondary wives. His wife Ankhesenamun was daughter of Akhenaton and Nefertiti. Tutankhamen came to the throne as a young child and ruled for about nine years under the regency of Vizier Ay and the strong influence of the army commander Horemheb. The main events of his reign were to move the capital of Egypt back from El-Amarna to Memphis and to begin the transition from the monotheistic cult of Aton created by Akhenaton back to the polytheistic religion of Egypt with Amun-Ra again as the main God.

Price: $30.00

Miketz From prison to palace

The rise of Joseph from Prison to Palace. God gave Joseph the power to interpret dreams, and when the Pharaoh had two disturbing dreams, Joseph was brought before the Pharaoh, and interpreted his dreams, of seven years of plenty, followed by seven years of famine (Gen 41:8-32).

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Joseph also suggested how to put this foreknowledge to good use, by storing produce in warehouses. Pharaoh charged Joseph, then at age thirty the rank and authority of a viceroy. When the famine came, it effected Canaan whereupon Jacob sent all his sons, except for Benjamin, to Egypt to buy food Traditions are formed not only by practices shaped by text and images, but also through oral expression. These distinctive illustrations represent the imagery of our history. Avi Katz created the designs to be part of the Ancient Ties Chai Style Collection. These exquisite images chronicle our roots by recounting the stories of the Bible.

Price: $24.00

Passover – Silk tie

“Offer the Passover sacrifice at its set time; you shall offer it on the fourteenth day in accordance with all its rules and rites”. (Numbers 9:3)

There are many symbolic items needed to remind us of the story of the Exodus. The mosaic blend of these ritual symbols help form the Seder (order). By having the items we have a constant reminder of the freedom we enjoy and remember the bondage long ago.

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Passover is celebrated for 8 days and always begins on the 15th day of the Hebrew month of Nisan.Passover celebrates the Jewish people’s freedom from Egyptian bondage that took place over 3,000 years ago, as told in the Book of Exodus. Under the reign of Pharaoh Rameses II, the leader Moses led his people out of Egypt after a series of 10 plagues that Moses warned the Pharaoh would devastate his people, if he refused to let them go. After each plague, the Pharaoh agreed to let the Hebrews go, but the Pharaoh soon changed his mind and continued to hold the Hebrews as slaves. Finally, after the 10th plague, the Pharoah let the Hebrews go for good. However, after the Hebrews left in a hurry, in fact so quickly that they did not have time to bake any bread for the trip to Canaan, and instead baked unleavened bread, called Matzah. The Pharaoh changed his mind and sent his army into the Sinai desert after the Hebrews. When they saw the Egyptian army fast approaching toward them, they called out in despair to Moses. Fortunately, g-d intervened and commanded Moses to strike his staff on the waters of the Red Sea. G-d then commanded Moses to strike the waters of the Red Sea again, just as the Egyptian army followed them through the parted Red Sea. The waters came together again, drowning the entire Egyptian army and the Hebrews were saved Since the time of Jewish freedom from Egyptian slavery, Jews have celebrated this historical event by having a feast called the ‘Seder’. The word ‘Seder’ means ‘order’ and refers to the order of historical events recalled in the Passover meal. The story of Passover is read from a book called the ‘Haggadah’. While the main story of Passover is read by Jews the world over, local customs and traditions have changed over time, so that the festival has been adapted to reflect the life and routine of individual communities. Passover celebrates this history. The first 2 nights of the 8 day holiday are celebrated with lavish meals in which the stories and history of Passover are celebrated. Passover is a celebration of Freedom. This holiday helps to remind us of the freedom we must protect and cherish. We are taught as well that people can and have been stripped of their right for freedom. Passover helps remind us to help ensure freedom for all of G-ds creation.

Price: $36.00

Va-Y’hi (Vayechi) The legacy of Ephraim and Menashe

Jacob’s family of seventy people traveled to Egypt, settled  and multiplied. Jacob reunited with his son Joseph and blessed Joseph’s children prior to passing away.

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Traditions are formed not only by practices shaped by text and images, but also through oral expression. These distinctive illustrations represent the imagery of our history. Avi Katz created the designs to be part of the Ancient Ties Chai Style Collection. These exquisite images chronicle our roots by recounting the stories of the Bible.

Price: $24.00

Va-yigash (Vayigash) A family reunion

A family reunions and brotherly love as expressed by Judah and Joseph. Previously we read that when the famine came, it effected Canaan whereupon Jacob sent all his sons, except for Benjamin, to Egypt to buy food. However Joseph sent them back with food but made them come back with Benjamin.

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When they were to return a second time he purposely accused Benjamin of steeling something that Josseph himself ordered to be placed in their sacks of food. Judah pleads for the life of Benjamin because of what it would do to Jacob, their father. At that point Joseph broke down told them he was their brother and eventually had his entire family move to Egypt to live. Traditions are formed not only by practices shaped by text and images, but also through oral expression. These distinctive illustrations represent the imagery of our history. Avi Katz created the designs to be part of the Ancient Ties Chai Style Collection. These exquisite images chronicle our roots by recounting the stories of the Bible.

Price: $24.00