Glass has been known to man for at least 3500 years. First made in Egypt, and then in Syria, glass vessels produced in a variety of ways were extremely popular throughout the Roman world.

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Neker Roman Glass Art Jar – Style CA+ II Pinkw/Mix

Glass has been known to man for at least 3500 years. First made in Egypt, and then in Syria, glass vessels produced in a variety of ways were extremely popular throughout the Roman world. Syria was an important production center making high quality decorative glass and exporting it to the rest of the Roman Empire.  The Neker glass holders  will make any occasions special.

The style of these glass jars is reminiscent of the ancient and delicate glass vessels that were found in archaeological excavations in Israel and are currently displayed in exclusive museums.

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Additional DescriptionMore Details

Glass captured the imagination of artisans in ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, who used it to fashion minute objects such as pendants, beads and inlays. In the mid-second millennium BCE, small glass containers were first produced as luxury items for the royal courts. These vessels were made in the core-forming technique in a variety of hues – principally deep blue, turquoise, yellow and white – which emulated semi-precious metals. Over the centuries various casting methods, as well as mosaic-glass and gold-glass techniques, were employed. As the demand for glass vessels increased, sophisticated production methods evolved and new forms were introduced. During the 1st Century glass came into daily use with a large variety of different wares being made. The characteristic transparency, delicacy, and subtle colors, as well as many of the forms – wineglasses, bottles, juglets and jars – that were introduced in the Roman period are still the trademarks of glassware today. Many of the vessels in this collection would have been used in a Roman citizen’s daily life as containers for oils, scents, foodstuffs and perfumed waters. The pieces are hand blown in Jerusalem, Israel by the Neker brothers. They have been blowing glass since 1959.

Price: $24.00

Neker Roman Glass Art Jar – Style CA+ III White w/Mix (image right)

Glass has been known to man for at least 3500 years. First made in Egypt, and then in Syria, glass vessels produced in a variety of ways were extremely popular throughout the Roman world. Syria was an important production center making high quality decorative glass and exporting it to the rest of the Roman Empire.  The Neker glass holders  will make any occasions special.

The style of these glass jars is reminiscent of the ancient and delicate glass vessels that were found in archaeological excavations in Israel and are currently displayed in exclusive museums.

| READ MORE |
Additional DescriptionMore Details

Glass captured the imagination of artisans in ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, who used it to fashion minute objects such as pendants, beads and inlays. In the mid-second millennium BCE, small glass containers were first produced as luxury items for the royal courts. These vessels were made in the core-forming technique in a variety of hues – principally deep blue, turquoise, yellow and white – which emulated semi-precious metals. Over the centuries various casting methods, as well as mosaic-glass and gold-glass techniques, were employed. As the demand for glass vessels increased, sophisticated production methods evolved and new forms were introduced. During the 1st Century glass came into daily use with a large variety of different wares being made. The characteristic transparency, delicacy, and subtle colors, as well as many of the forms – wineglasses, bottles, juglets and jars – that were introduced in the Roman period are still the trademarks of glassware today. Many of the vessels in this collection would have been used in a Roman citizen’s daily life as containers for oils, scents, foodstuffs and perfumed waters. The pieces are hand blown in Jerusalem, Israel by the Neker brothers. They have been blowing glass since 1959.

Price: $24.00

Neker Roman Glass Art Jar – Style CA+ IV Blue w/Mix

Glass has been known to man for at least 3500 years. First made in Egypt, and then in Syria, glass vessels produced in a variety of ways were extremely popular throughout the Roman world. Syria was an important production center making high quality decorative glass and exporting it to the rest of the Roman Empire.  The Neker glass holders  will make any occasions special.

The style of these glass jars is reminiscent of the ancient and delicate glass vessels that were found in archaeological excavations in Israel and are currently displayed in exclusive museums.

| READ MORE |
Additional DescriptionMore Details

Glass captured the imagination of artisans in ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, who used it to fashion minute objects such as pendants, beads and inlays. In the mid-second millennium BCE, small glass containers were first produced as luxury items for the royal courts. These vessels were made in the core-forming technique in a variety of hues – principally deep blue, turquoise, yellow and white – which emulated semi-precious metals. Over the centuries various casting methods, as well as mosaic-glass and gold-glass techniques, were employed. As the demand for glass vessels increased, sophisticated production methods evolved and new forms were introduced. During the 1st Century glass came into daily use with a large variety of different wares being made. The characteristic transparency, delicacy, and subtle colors, as well as many of the forms – wineglasses, bottles, juglets and jars – that were introduced in the Roman period are still the trademarks of glassware today. Many of the vessels in this collection would have been used in a Roman citizen’s daily life as containers for oils, scents, foodstuffs and perfumed waters. The pieces are hand blown in Jerusalem, Israel by the Neker brothers. They have been blowing glass since 1959.

Price: $24.00

Neker Roman Glass Art Jar – Style CA+ V White w/Black Mix

Glass has been known to man for at least 3500 years. First made in Egypt, and then in Syria, glass vessels produced in a variety of ways were extremely popular throughout the Roman world. Syria was an important production center making high quality decorative glass and exporting it to the rest of the Roman Empire.  The Neker glass holders  will make any occasions special.

The style of these glass jars is reminiscent of the ancient and delicate glass vessels that were found in archaeological excavations in Israel and are currently displayed in exclusive museums.

| READ MORE |
Additional DescriptionMore Details

Glass captured the imagination of artisans in ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, who used it to fashion minute objects such as pendants, beads and inlays. In the mid-second millennium BCE, small glass containers were first produced as luxury items for the royal courts. These vessels were made in the core-forming technique in a variety of hues – principally deep blue, turquoise, yellow and white – which emulated semi-precious metals. Over the centuries various casting methods, as well as mosaic-glass and gold-glass techniques, were employed. As the demand for glass vessels increased, sophisticated production methods evolved and new forms were introduced. During the 1st Century glass came into daily use with a large variety of different wares being made. The characteristic transparency, delicacy, and subtle colors, as well as many of the forms – wineglasses, bottles, juglets and jars – that were introduced in the Roman period are still the trademarks of glassware today. Many of the vessels in this collection would have been used in a Roman citizen’s daily life as containers for oils, scents, foodstuffs and perfumed waters. The pieces are hand blown in Jerusalem, Israel by the Neker brothers. They have been blowing glass since 1959.

Price: $24.00

Neker Roman Glass Art Jar – Style CM I Green

Glass has been known to man for at least 3500 years. First made in Egypt, and then in Syria, glass vessels produced in a variety of ways were extremely popular throughout the Roman world. Syria was an important production center making high quality decorative glass and exporting it to the rest of the Roman Empire.  The Neker glass holders  will make any occasions special.

The style of these glass jars is reminiscent of the ancient and delicate glass vessels that were found in archaeological excavations in Israel and are currently displayed in exclusive museums.

| READ MORE |
Additional DescriptionMore Details

Glass captured the imagination of artisans in ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, who used it to fashion minute objects such as pendants, beads and inlays. In the mid-second millennium BCE, small glass containers were first produced as luxury items for the royal courts. These vessels were made in the core-forming technique in a variety of hues – principally deep blue, turquoise, yellow and white – which emulated semi-precious metals. Over the centuries various casting methods, as well as mosaic-glass and gold-glass techniques, were employed. As the demand for glass vessels increased, sophisticated production methods evolved and new forms were introduced. During the 1st Century glass came into daily use with a large variety of different wares being made. The characteristic transparency, delicacy, and subtle colors, as well as many of the forms – wineglasses, bottles, juglets and jars – that were introduced in the Roman period are still the trademarks of glassware today. Many of the vessels in this collection would have been used in a Roman citizen’s daily life as containers for oils, scents, foodstuffs and perfumed waters. The pieces are hand blown in Jerusalem, Israel by the Neker brothers. They have been blowing glass since 1959.

Price: $24.00

Neker Roman Glass Art Jar – Style CM II Blue

Glass has been known to man for at least 3500 years. First made in Egypt, and then in Syria, glass vessels produced in a variety of ways were extremely popular throughout the Roman world. Syria was an important production center making high quality decorative glass and exporting it to the rest of the Roman Empire.  The Neker glass holders  will make any occasions special.

The style of these glass jars is reminiscent of the ancient and delicate glass vessels that were found in archaeological excavations in Israel and are currently displayed in exclusive museums.

| READ MORE |
Additional DescriptionMore Details

Glass captured the imagination of artisans in ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, who used it to fashion minute objects such as pendants, beads and inlays. In the mid-second millennium BCE, small glass containers were first produced as luxury items for the royal courts. These vessels were made in the core-forming technique in a variety of hues – principally deep blue, turquoise, yellow and white – which emulated semi-precious metals. Over the centuries various casting methods, as well as mosaic-glass and gold-glass techniques, were employed. As the demand for glass vessels increased, sophisticated production methods evolved and new forms were introduced. During the 1st Century glass came into daily use with a large variety of different wares being made. The characteristic transparency, delicacy, and subtle colors, as well as many of the forms – wineglasses, bottles, juglets and jars – that were introduced in the Roman period are still the trademarks of glassware today. Many of the vessels in this collection would have been used in a Roman citizen’s daily life as containers for oils, scents, foodstuffs and perfumed waters. The pieces are hand blown in Jerusalem, Israel by the Neker brothers. They have been blowing glass since 1959.

Price: $24.00

Neker Roman Glass Art Jar – Style CM III Red

Glass has been known to man for at least 3500 years. First made in Egypt, and then in Syria, glass vessels produced in a variety of ways were extremely popular throughout the Roman world. Syria was an important production center making high quality decorative glass and exporting it to the rest of the Roman Empire.  The Neker glass holders  will make any occasions special.

The style of these glass jars is reminiscent of the ancient and delicate glass vessels that were found in archaeological excavations in Israel and are currently displayed in exclusive museums.

| READ MORE |
Additional DescriptionMore Details

Glass captured the imagination of artisans in ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, who used it to fashion minute objects such as pendants, beads and inlays. In the mid-second millennium BCE, small glass containers were first produced as luxury items for the royal courts. These vessels were made in the core-forming technique in a variety of hues – principally deep blue, turquoise, yellow and white – which emulated semi-precious metals. Over the centuries various casting methods, as well as mosaic-glass and gold-glass techniques, were employed. As the demand for glass vessels increased, sophisticated production methods evolved and new forms were introduced. During the 1st Century glass came into daily use with a large variety of different wares being made. The characteristic transparency, delicacy, and subtle colors, as well as many of the forms – wineglasses, bottles, juglets and jars – that were introduced in the Roman period are still the trademarks of glassware today. Many of the vessels in this collection would have been used in a Roman citizen’s daily life as containers for oils, scents, foodstuffs and perfumed waters. The pieces are hand blown in Jerusalem, Israel by the Neker brothers. They have been blowing glass since 1959.

Price: $24.00

Neker Roman Glass Art Jar – Style CM IV Red

Glass has been known to man for at least 3500 years. First made in Egypt, and then in Syria, glass vessels produced in a variety of ways were extremely popular throughout the Roman world. Syria was an important production center making high quality decorative glass and exporting it to the rest of the Roman Empire.  The Neker glass holders  will make any occasions special.

The style of these glass jars is reminiscent of the ancient and delicate glass vessels that were found in archaeological excavations in Israel and are currently displayed in exclusive museums.

| READ MORE |
Additional DescriptionMore Details

Glass captured the imagination of artisans in ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, who used it to fashion minute objects such as pendants, beads and inlays. In the mid-second millennium BCE, small glass containers were first produced as luxury items for the royal courts. These vessels were made in the core-forming technique in a variety of hues – principally deep blue, turquoise, yellow and white – which emulated semi-precious metals. Over the centuries various casting methods, as well as mosaic-glass and gold-glass techniques, were employed. As the demand for glass vessels increased, sophisticated production methods evolved and new forms were introduced. During the 1st Century glass came into daily use with a large variety of different wares being made. The characteristic transparency, delicacy, and subtle colors, as well as many of the forms – wineglasses, bottles, juglets and jars – that were introduced in the Roman period are still the trademarks of glassware today. Many of the vessels in this collection would have been used in a Roman citizen’s daily life as containers for oils, scents, foodstuffs and perfumed waters. The pieces are hand blown in Jerusalem, Israel by the Neker brothers. They have been blowing glass since 1959.

Price: $24.00

Neker Roman Glass Art Jar – Style CM IV Red

Glass has been known to man for at least 3500 years. First made in Egypt, and then in Syria, glass vessels produced in a variety of ways were extremely popular throughout the Roman world. Syria was an important production center making high quality decorative glass and exporting it to the rest of the Roman Empire.  The Neker glass holders  will make any occasions special.

The style of these glass jars is reminiscent of the ancient and delicate glass vessels that were found in archaeological excavations in Israel and are currently displayed in exclusive museums.

| READ MORE |
Additional DescriptionMore Details

Glass captured the imagination of artisans in ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, who used it to fashion minute objects such as pendants, beads and inlays. In the mid-second millennium BCE, small glass containers were first produced as luxury items for the royal courts. These vessels were made in the core-forming technique in a variety of hues – principally deep blue, turquoise, yellow and white – which emulated semi-precious metals. Over the centuries various casting methods, as well as mosaic-glass and gold-glass techniques, were employed. As the demand for glass vessels increased, sophisticated production methods evolved and new forms were introduced. During the 1st Century glass came into daily use with a large variety of different wares being made. The characteristic transparency, delicacy, and subtle colors, as well as many of the forms – wineglasses, bottles, juglets and jars – that were introduced in the Roman period are still the trademarks of glassware today. Many of the vessels in this collection would have been used in a Roman citizen’s daily life as containers for oils, scents, foodstuffs and perfumed waters. The pieces are hand blown in Jerusalem, Israel by the Neker brothers. They have been blowing glass since 1959.

Price: $24.00

Neker Roman Glass Art Jar – Style CM+ I Green

Glass has been known to man for at least 3500 years. First made in Egypt, and then in Syria, glass vessels produced in a variety of ways were extremely popular throughout the Roman world. Syria was an important production center making high quality decorative glass and exporting it to the rest of the Roman Empire.  The Neker glass holders  will make any occasions special.

The style of these glass jars is reminiscent of the ancient and delicate glass vessels that were found in archaeological excavations in Israel and are currently displayed in exclusive museums.

| READ MORE |
Additional DescriptionMore Details

Glass captured the imagination of artisans in ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, who used it to fashion minute objects such as pendants, beads and inlays. In the mid-second millennium BCE, small glass containers were first produced as luxury items for the royal courts. These vessels were made in the core-forming technique in a variety of hues – principally deep blue, turquoise, yellow and white – which emulated semi-precious metals. Over the centuries various casting methods, as well as mosaic-glass and gold-glass techniques, were employed. As the demand for glass vessels increased, sophisticated production methods evolved and new forms were introduced. During the 1st Century glass came into daily use with a large variety of different wares being made. The characteristic transparency, delicacy, and subtle colors, as well as many of the forms – wineglasses, bottles, juglets and jars – that were introduced in the Roman period are still the trademarks of glassware today. Many of the vessels in this collection would have been used in a Roman citizen’s daily life as containers for oils, scents, foodstuffs and perfumed waters. The pieces are hand blown in Jerusalem, Israel by the Neker brothers. They have been blowing glass since 1959.

Price: $28.00

Neker Roman Glass Art Jar – Style CM+ II Green

Glass has been known to man for at least 3500 years. First made in Egypt, and then in Syria, glass vessels produced in a variety of ways were extremely popular throughout the Roman world. Syria was an important production center making high quality decorative glass and exporting it to the rest of the Roman Empire.  The Neker glass holders  will make any occasions special.

The style of these glass jars is reminiscent of the ancient and delicate glass vessels that were found in archaeological excavations in Israel and are currently displayed in exclusive museums.

| READ MORE |
Additional DescriptionMore Details

Glass captured the imagination of artisans in ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, who used it to fashion minute objects such as pendants, beads and inlays. In the mid-second millennium BCE, small glass containers were first produced as luxury items for the royal courts. These vessels were made in the core-forming technique in a variety of hues – principally deep blue, turquoise, yellow and white – which emulated semi-precious metals. Over the centuries various casting methods, as well as mosaic-glass and gold-glass techniques, were employed. As the demand for glass vessels increased, sophisticated production methods evolved and new forms were introduced. During the 1st Century glass came into daily use with a large variety of different wares being made. The characteristic transparency, delicacy, and subtle colors, as well as many of the forms – wineglasses, bottles, juglets and jars – that were introduced in the Roman period are still the trademarks of glassware today. Many of the vessels in this collection would have been used in a Roman citizen’s daily life as containers for oils, scents, foodstuffs and perfumed waters. The pieces are hand blown in Jerusalem, Israel by the Neker brothers. They have been blowing glass since 1959.

Price: $28.00

Neker Roman Glass Art Jar – Style CM+ III Blue

Glass has been known to man for at least 3500 years. First made in Egypt, and then in Syria, glass vessels produced in a variety of ways were extremely popular throughout the Roman world. Syria was an important production center making high quality decorative glass and exporting it to the rest of the Roman Empire.  The Neker glass holders  will make any occasions special.

The style of these glass jars is reminiscent of the ancient and delicate glass vessels that were found in archaeological excavations in Israel and are currently displayed in exclusive museums.

| READ MORE |
Additional DescriptionMore Details

Glass captured the imagination of artisans in ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, who used it to fashion minute objects such as pendants, beads and inlays. In the mid-second millennium BCE, small glass containers were first produced as luxury items for the royal courts. These vessels were made in the core-forming technique in a variety of hues – principally deep blue, turquoise, yellow and white – which emulated semi-precious metals. Over the centuries various casting methods, as well as mosaic-glass and gold-glass techniques, were employed. As the demand for glass vessels increased, sophisticated production methods evolved and new forms were introduced. During the 1st Century glass came into daily use with a large variety of different wares being made. The characteristic transparency, delicacy, and subtle colors, as well as many of the forms – wineglasses, bottles, juglets and jars – that were introduced in the Roman period are still the trademarks of glassware today. Many of the vessels in this collection would have been used in a Roman citizen’s daily life as containers for oils, scents, foodstuffs and perfumed waters. The pieces are hand blown in Jerusalem, Israel by the Neker brothers. They have been blowing glass since 1959.

Price: $28.00