Glass has been known to man for at least 3500 years. First made in Egypt, and then in Syria, glass vessels produced in a variety of ways were extremely popular throughout the Roman world.

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Neker Roman Glass Art Perfume Jar – Style EA- V White w/Mix (Duplicate)

Glass has been known to man for at least 3500 years. First made in Egypt, and then in Syria, glass vessels produced in a variety of ways were extremely popular throughout the Roman world. Syria was an important production center making high quality decorative glass and exporting it to the rest of the Roman Empire.  The Neker glass holders  will make any occasions special.

The style of these glass jars is reminiscent of the ancient and delicate glass vessels that were found in archaeological excavations in Israel and are currently displayed in exclusive museums.

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Additional DescriptionMore Details

Glass captured the imagination of artisans in ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, who used it to fashion minute objects such as pendants, beads and inlays. In the mid-second millennium BCE, small glass containers were first produced as luxury items for the royal courts. These vessels were made in the core-forming technique in a variety of hues – principally deep blue, turquoise, yellow and white – which emulated semi-precious metals. Over the centuries various casting methods, as well as mosaic-glass and gold-glass techniques, were employed. As the demand for glass vessels increased, sophisticated production methods evolved and new forms were introduced. During the 1st Century glass came into daily use with a large variety of different wares being made. The characteristic transparency, delicacy, and subtle colors, as well as many of the forms – wineglasses, bottles, juglets and jars – that were introduced in the Roman period are still the trademarks of glassware today. Many of the vessels in this collection would have been used in a Roman citizen’s daily life as containers for oils, scents, foodstuffs and perfumed waters. The pieces are hand blown in Jerusalem, Israel by the Neker brothers. They have been blowing glass since 1959.

Price: $16.00

Neker Roman Glass Art Perfume Jar – Style EA- VI Blue w/Gold

Glass has been known to man for at least 3500 years. First made in Egypt, and then in Syria, glass vessels produced in a variety of ways were extremely popular throughout the Roman world. Syria was an important production center making high quality decorative glass and exporting it to the rest of the Roman Empire.  The Neker glass holders  will make any occasions special.

The style of these glass jars is reminiscent of the ancient and delicate glass vessels that were found in archaeological excavations in Israel and are currently displayed in exclusive museums.

| READ MORE |
Additional DescriptionMore Details

Glass captured the imagination of artisans in ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, who used it to fashion minute objects such as pendants, beads and inlays. In the mid-second millennium BCE, small glass containers were first produced as luxury items for the royal courts. These vessels were made in the core-forming technique in a variety of hues – principally deep blue, turquoise, yellow and white – which emulated semi-precious metals. Over the centuries various casting methods, as well as mosaic-glass and gold-glass techniques, were employed. As the demand for glass vessels increased, sophisticated production methods evolved and new forms were introduced. During the 1st Century glass came into daily use with a large variety of different wares being made. The characteristic transparency, delicacy, and subtle colors, as well as many of the forms – wineglasses, bottles, juglets and jars – that were introduced in the Roman period are still the trademarks of glassware today. Many of the vessels in this collection would have been used in a Roman citizen’s daily life as containers for oils, scents, foodstuffs and perfumed waters. The pieces are hand blown in Jerusalem, Israel by the Neker brothers. They have been blowing glass since 1959.

Price: $16.00

Neker Roman Glass Art Perfume Jar – Style EA- VII Pink w/Gold

Glass has been known to man for at least 3500 years. First made in Egypt, and then in Syria, glass vessels produced in a variety of ways were extremely popular throughout the Roman world. Syria was an important production center making high quality decorative glass and exporting it to the rest of the Roman Empire.  The Neker glass holders  will make any occasions special.

The style of these glass jars is reminiscent of the ancient and delicate glass vessels that were found in archaeological excavations in Israel and are currently displayed in exclusive museums.

| READ MORE |
Additional DescriptionMore Details

Glass captured the imagination of artisans in ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, who used it to fashion minute objects such as pendants, beads and inlays. In the mid-second millennium BCE, small glass containers were first produced as luxury items for the royal courts. These vessels were made in the core-forming technique in a variety of hues – principally deep blue, turquoise, yellow and white – which emulated semi-precious metals. Over the centuries various casting methods, as well as mosaic-glass and gold-glass techniques, were employed. As the demand for glass vessels increased, sophisticated production methods evolved and new forms were introduced. During the 1st Century glass came into daily use with a large variety of different wares being made. The characteristic transparency, delicacy, and subtle colors, as well as many of the forms – wineglasses, bottles, juglets and jars – that were introduced in the Roman period are still the trademarks of glassware today. Many of the vessels in this collection would have been used in a Roman citizen’s daily life as containers for oils, scents, foodstuffs and perfumed waters. The pieces are hand blown in Jerusalem, Israel by the Neker brothers. They have been blowing glass since 1959.

Price: $16.00

Neker Roman Glass Art Perfume Jar – Style EA- VIII White w/Blue Mix

Glass has been known to man for at least 3500 years. First made in Egypt, and then in Syria, glass vessels produced in a variety of ways were extremely popular throughout the Roman world. Syria was an important production center making high quality decorative glass and exporting it to the rest of the Roman Empire.  The Neker glass holders  will make any occasions special.

The style of these glass jars is reminiscent of the ancient and delicate glass vessels that were found in archaeological excavations in Israel and are currently displayed in exclusive museums.

| READ MORE |
Additional DescriptionMore Details

Glass captured the imagination of artisans in ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, who used it to fashion minute objects such as pendants, beads and inlays. In the mid-second millennium BCE, small glass containers were first produced as luxury items for the royal courts. These vessels were made in the core-forming technique in a variety of hues – principally deep blue, turquoise, yellow and white – which emulated semi-precious metals. Over the centuries various casting methods, as well as mosaic-glass and gold-glass techniques, were employed. As the demand for glass vessels increased, sophisticated production methods evolved and new forms were introduced. During the 1st Century glass came into daily use with a large variety of different wares being made. The characteristic transparency, delicacy, and subtle colors, as well as many of the forms – wineglasses, bottles, juglets and jars – that were introduced in the Roman period are still the trademarks of glassware today. Many of the vessels in this collection would have been used in a Roman citizen’s daily life as containers for oils, scents, foodstuffs and perfumed waters. The pieces are hand blown in Jerusalem, Israel by the Neker brothers. They have been blowing glass since 1959.

Price: $16.00

Neker Roman Glass Art Perfume Jar – Style EA- X Pink w/Mix

Glass has been known to man for at least 3500 years. First made in Egypt, and then in Syria, glass vessels produced in a variety of ways were extremely popular throughout the Roman world. Syria was an important production center making high quality decorative glass and exporting it to the rest of the Roman Empire.  The Neker glass holders  will make any occasions special.

The style of these glass jars is reminiscent of the ancient and delicate glass vessels that were found in archaeological excavations in Israel and are currently displayed in exclusive museums.

| READ MORE |
Additional DescriptionMore Details

Glass captured the imagination of artisans in ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, who used it to fashion minute objects such as pendants, beads and inlays. In the mid-second millennium BCE, small glass containers were first produced as luxury items for the royal courts. These vessels were made in the core-forming technique in a variety of hues – principally deep blue, turquoise, yellow and white – which emulated semi-precious metals. Over the centuries various casting methods, as well as mosaic-glass and gold-glass techniques, were employed. As the demand for glass vessels increased, sophisticated production methods evolved and new forms were introduced. During the 1st Century glass came into daily use with a large variety of different wares being made. The characteristic transparency, delicacy, and subtle colors, as well as many of the forms – wineglasses, bottles, juglets and jars – that were introduced in the Roman period are still the trademarks of glassware today. Many of the vessels in this collection would have been used in a Roman citizen’s daily life as containers for oils, scents, foodstuffs and perfumed waters. The pieces are hand blown in Jerusalem, Israel by the Neker brothers. They have been blowing glass since 1959.

Price: $16.00

Neker Roman Glass Art Perfume Jar – Style EM+ I Green

Glass has been known to man for at least 3500 years. First made in Egypt, and then in Syria, glass vessels produced in a variety of ways were extremely popular throughout the Roman world. Syria was an important production center making high quality decorative glass and exporting it to the rest of the Roman Empire.  The Neker glass holders  will make any occasions special.

The style of these glass jars is reminiscent of the ancient and delicate glass vessels that were found in archaeological excavations in Israel and are currently displayed in exclusive museums.

| READ MORE |
Additional DescriptionMore Details

Glass captured the imagination of artisans in ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, who used it to fashion minute objects such as pendants, beads and inlays. In the mid-second millennium BCE, small glass containers were first produced as luxury items for the royal courts. These vessels were made in the core-forming technique in a variety of hues – principally deep blue, turquoise, yellow and white – which emulated semi-precious metals. Over the centuries various casting methods, as well as mosaic-glass and gold-glass techniques, were employed. As the demand for glass vessels increased, sophisticated production methods evolved and new forms were introduced. During the 1st Century glass came into daily use with a large variety of different wares being made. The characteristic transparency, delicacy, and subtle colors, as well as many of the forms – wineglasses, bottles, juglets and jars – that were introduced in the Roman period are still the trademarks of glassware today. Many of the vessels in this collection would have been used in a Roman citizen’s daily life as containers for oils, scents, foodstuffs and perfumed waters. The pieces are hand blown in Jerusalem, Israel by the Neker brothers. They have been blowing glass since 1959.

Price: $28.00

Neker Roman Glass Art Perfume Jar – Style EM+ II Blue

Glass has been known to man for at least 3500 years. First made in Egypt, and then in Syria, glass vessels produced in a variety of ways were extremely popular throughout the Roman world. Syria was an important production center making high quality decorative glass and exporting it to the rest of the Roman Empire.  The Neker glass holders  will make any occasions special.

The style of these glass jars is reminiscent of the ancient and delicate glass vessels that were found in archaeological excavations in Israel and are currently displayed in exclusive museums.

| READ MORE |
Additional DescriptionMore Details

Glass captured the imagination of artisans in ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, who used it to fashion minute objects such as pendants, beads and inlays. In the mid-second millennium BCE, small glass containers were first produced as luxury items for the royal courts. These vessels were made in the core-forming technique in a variety of hues – principally deep blue, turquoise, yellow and white – which emulated semi-precious metals. Over the centuries various casting methods, as well as mosaic-glass and gold-glass techniques, were employed. As the demand for glass vessels increased, sophisticated production methods evolved and new forms were introduced. During the 1st Century glass came into daily use with a large variety of different wares being made. The characteristic transparency, delicacy, and subtle colors, as well as many of the forms – wineglasses, bottles, juglets and jars – that were introduced in the Roman period are still the trademarks of glassware today. Many of the vessels in this collection would have been used in a Roman citizen’s daily life as containers for oils, scents, foodstuffs and perfumed waters. The pieces are hand blown in Jerusalem, Israel by the Neker brothers. They have been blowing glass since 1959.

Price: $28.00

Neker Roman Glass Art Perfume Jar – Style EM+ III Green

Glass has been known to man for at least 3500 years. First made in Egypt, and then in Syria, glass vessels produced in a variety of ways were extremely popular throughout the Roman world. Syria was an important production center making high quality decorative glass and exporting it to the rest of the Roman Empire.  The Neker glass holders  will make any occasions special.

The style of these glass jars is reminiscent of the ancient and delicate glass vessels that were found in archaeological excavations in Israel and are currently displayed in exclusive museums.

| READ MORE |
Additional DescriptionMore Details

Glass captured the imagination of artisans in ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, who used it to fashion minute objects such as pendants, beads and inlays. In the mid-second millennium BCE, small glass containers were first produced as luxury items for the royal courts. These vessels were made in the core-forming technique in a variety of hues – principally deep blue, turquoise, yellow and white – which emulated semi-precious metals. Over the centuries various casting methods, as well as mosaic-glass and gold-glass techniques, were employed. As the demand for glass vessels increased, sophisticated production methods evolved and new forms were introduced. During the 1st Century glass came into daily use with a large variety of different wares being made. The characteristic transparency, delicacy, and subtle colors, as well as many of the forms – wineglasses, bottles, juglets and jars – that were introduced in the Roman period are still the trademarks of glassware today. Many of the vessels in this collection would have been used in a Roman citizen’s daily life as containers for oils, scents, foodstuffs and perfumed waters. The pieces are hand blown in Jerusalem, Israel by the Neker brothers. They have been blowing glass since 1959.

Price: $28.00

Neker Roman Glass Art Perfume Jar – Style EM+ IV Red

Glass has been known to man for at least 3500 years. First made in Egypt, and then in Syria, glass vessels produced in a variety of ways were extremely popular throughout the Roman world. Syria was an important production center making high quality decorative glass and exporting it to the rest of the Roman Empire.  The Neker glass holders  will make any occasions special.

The style of these glass jars is reminiscent of the ancient and delicate glass vessels that were found in archaeological excavations in Israel and are currently displayed in exclusive museums.

| READ MORE |
Additional DescriptionMore Details

Glass captured the imagination of artisans in ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, who used it to fashion minute objects such as pendants, beads and inlays. In the mid-second millennium BCE, small glass containers were first produced as luxury items for the royal courts. These vessels were made in the core-forming technique in a variety of hues – principally deep blue, turquoise, yellow and white – which emulated semi-precious metals. Over the centuries various casting methods, as well as mosaic-glass and gold-glass techniques, were employed. As the demand for glass vessels increased, sophisticated production methods evolved and new forms were introduced. During the 1st Century glass came into daily use with a large variety of different wares being made. The characteristic transparency, delicacy, and subtle colors, as well as many of the forms – wineglasses, bottles, juglets and jars – that were introduced in the Roman period are still the trademarks of glassware today. Many of the vessels in this collection would have been used in a Roman citizen’s daily life as containers for oils, scents, foodstuffs and perfumed waters. The pieces are hand blown in Jerusalem, Israel by the Neker brothers. They have been blowing glass since 1959.

Price: $28.00

Qumran and The Dead Sea Scrolls Ornament

This design depicts the desert surroundings of the community of Qumran. In the foreground are the cliffs and  cave where the scrolls were found. The pottery jar which held the scrolls with some of the aged pieces of parchments found.

This design has been painted from the inside of the glass by skilled artisan. This ancient technique is achieved by special curved brushes that are inserted from the top hole.

 

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The origins of the Qumran communities are believed to be of Essenes, the pious anti-Hellenistic circles formed in the early days of the Maccabees. The tie feature parts of the scrolls found in Qumran with other vessels found at the excavations. In 1947, a Bedouin shepherd boy accidentally stumbled upon one of the century’s greatest finds in a dark cave in the Judean desert. He sold three of the seven scrolls to an antiquities dealer in Bethlehem, who in turn sold them to the archaeologist Prof Sukenik of the Hebrew University. Over the years, thousands more fragments of parchment, some papyrus and some leather, were found and pieced together into 80 documents. Since 1965, the scrolls have been on display at the Israel Museum in the Shrine of the Book. The pieces of parchment were well-preserved by the dry desert climate of the region. The Dead Sea Scrolls represent a turning point in Jewish history. They reveal the link between Biblical Israel and the Jewish culture of the Talmudic period. They are the oldest known copy of the Old Testament. Scholar’s opinion regarding the time span and background of the Dead Sea Scrolls is anchored in historical, paleographic, and linguistic evidence, corroborated firmly by carbon 14-datings. Some manuscripts were written and copied in the third century B.C.E., but the bulk of the material, particularly the texts that reflect on a sectarian community, are originals or copies from the first century B.C.E.; a number of texts date from as late as the years preceding the destruction of the site in 68 C.E. at the hands of the Roman legions. The origins of the Qumran communities are believed to be of Essenes, the pious anti-Hellenistic circles formed in the early days of the Maccabees. who were concerned about growing Hellenization and strove to abide by the Torah. Archeological and historical evidence indicates that Qumran abandoned about the time of the Roman incursion of 68 C.E., two years before the collapse of Jewish self-government in Judea and the destruction of the Temple in Jerusalem in 70 C.E. The Essenes persisted in a separatist existence through two centuries, occupying themselves with study and a communal way of life that included worship, prayer, and work. Many of the non-Old Testament scrolls contain details about the Essene sect and their values. One of the scrolls tells the story of the battle between the “sons of light and the sons of darkness” and echoes the struggle between good and evil. The Essenes included celibate men, a phenomenon rarely found in Judaism, and their influence on the early Christians is unquestionable, making the scrolls of immense interest to Christian, as well as Jewish scholars. Undoubtedly these ancient manuscripts will remain a witness to Jewish continuity and a source of knowledge regarding the roots of Christianity for centuries to come.

Price: $30.00

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