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8 branched Oil Menorah / Hanukiya with Removable Shamash

While Moses was on Mount Sinai, Moses received numerous instructions regarding the building of the sanctuary and articles within this house of G-d. One of the main items in this house would be the 7 branched menorah. Twice in the book of Exodus we find a detailed description (25:31-38 and 37:17-24) of its construction and use. This candelabrum has taken many forms throughout history.

 

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Price: $75.00

8 branched Snake candle Menorah / Hanukiya White/Red

While Moses was on Mount Sinai, Moses received numerous instructions regarding the building of the sanctuary and articles within this house of G-d. One of the main items in this house would be the 7 branched menorah. Twice in the book of Exodus we find a detailed description (25:31-38 and 37:17-24) of its construction and use. This candelabrum has taken many forms throughout history.

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During the years of the Sanctuary in the desert and later in the days of the 1st and 2nd Temple the purpose of the menorah was to be a light both internal and external. The menorah is a symbol of the nation of Israel “a light unto the nations.” (Isaiah 42:6). The light of the menorah as being a source of power as found in a vision of Zechariah 4:1-6. G-d explains: “Not by might, nor by power, but by My spirit.” During the rule of the Antiochus the 2nd Temple was looted. After defeating the Syrians, the Hasmonaens wanted to purify the Temple and light the menorah though only enough oil for one day was found. The 8 day holiday of Chanukah commemorates the miracle that a day’s worth of oil for this menorah lasted eight days. Spoils of war have marked the destruction of the first and second temple. The Romans have erected a victory arch in Rome which has the menorah being carried symbolizing the capture of Jerusalem. There are scholars who argue that this could not have been the menorah that stood in the Temple since in its depiction in the arch there are symbols of animal gods worshipped by the Romans that contradict the belief of praying to one god. After the Temples were destroyed, a prohibition by the rabbis made sure that no 3 dimensional menorah would be developed not to duplicate anything from the Temple. However, throughout the years, many artisans have chosen to express themselves artistically through using the symbol of the menorah. Israel’s first art academy, which is in Jerusalem, was named for Bezalel the biblical artisan who was commissioned to make the seven-branched gold menorah. The state of Israel has adopted the menorah design as its state emblem from the arch of Titus in Rome, Italy because for the state of Israel the menorah symbolizes the national revival of Israel as apposed to the destruction and exile it has been through which is seen in Rome, Italy.

Price: $75.00

8 branched Snake candle Menorah / Hanukiya Teal

While Moses was on Mount Sinai, Moses received numerous instructions regarding the building of the sanctuary and articles within this house of G-d. One of the main items in this house would be the 7 branched menorah. Twice in the book of Exodus we find a detailed description (25:31-38 and 37:17-24) of its construction and use. This candelabrum has taken many forms throughout history.

| READ MORE |
Additional DescriptionMore Details

During the years of the Sanctuary in the desert and later in the days of the 1st and 2nd Temple the purpose of the menorah was to be a light both internal and external. The menorah is a symbol of the nation of Israel “a light unto the nations.” (Isaiah 42:6). The light of the menorah as being a source of power as found in a vision of Zechariah 4:1-6. G-d explains: “Not by might, nor by power, but by My spirit.” During the rule of the Antiochus the 2nd Temple was looted. After defeating the Syrians, the Hasmonaens wanted to purify the Temple and light the menorah though only enough oil for one day was found. The 8 day holiday of Chanukah commemorates the miracle that a day’s worth of oil for this menorah lasted eight days. Spoils of war have marked the destruction of the first and second temple. The Romans have erected a victory arch in Rome which has the menorah being carried symbolizing the capture of Jerusalem. There are scholars who argue that this could not have been the menorah that stood in the Temple since in its depiction in the arch there are symbols of animal gods worshipped by the Romans that contradict the belief of praying to one god. After the Temples were destroyed, a prohibition by the rabbis made sure that no 3 dimensional menorah would be developed not to duplicate anything from the Temple. However, throughout the years, many artisans have chosen to express themselves artistically through using the symbol of the menorah. Israel’s first art academy, which is in Jerusalem, was named for Bezalel the biblical artisan who was commissioned to make the seven-branched gold menorah. The state of Israel has adopted the menorah design as its state emblem from the arch of Titus in Rome, Italy because for the state of Israel the menorah symbolizes the national revival of Israel as apposed to the destruction and exile it has been through which is seen in Rome, Italy.

Price: $75.00

Glass Color Filled Spinning Tops/Dreidels Blue

These spinning tops are hand made. Give them a spin and watch the color rise to the sides. These Dreidles have the 4 letters represented the phrase ” a great miracle happened here” since they are made in Jerusalem, Israel.

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Price: $15.00

Glass Color Filled Spinning Tops/Dreidels Green

These spinning tops are hand made. Give them a spin and watch the color rise to the sides. These Dreidles have the 4 letters represented the phrase ” a great miracle happened here” since they are made in Jerusalem, Israel.

 

 

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Price: $15.00

Glass Color Filled Spinning Tops/Dreidels Orange

These spinning tops are hand made. Give them a spin and watch the color rise to the sides. These Dreidles have the 4 letters represented the phrase ” a great miracle happened here” since they are made in Jerusalem, Israel.

 

 

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Price: $15.00

Glass Color Filled Spinning Tops/Dreidels Pink

These spinning tops are hand made. Give them a spin and watch the color rise to the sides. These Dreidles have the 4 letters represented the phrase ” a great miracle happened here” since they are made in Jerusalem, Israel.

 

 

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Price: $15.00

Hi Ne Ma Tov Friendship pottery candle holder.

“Behold, how good and how pleasant it is for brethren to dwell together in harmony” The text from Psalm 133 helps us reflect and recall the goodness friendship gives us. Friends are there for us to share with in all occasions.

 

 

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This circle shows friends coming together around a camp fire holding supporting one another and being as one. The feet are in the midst of dance where the bodies rely on one another for support and at the same time are supporting the people on both sides. Tradition is filled with stories and laws that explain how a person should acquire friends and also how to treat other people the way we want to be treated. Tradition teaches that people like to be surrounded by friends. This circle helps remind you of the good fortune you have and receive from the friendships which are built and cherished. When we dance we can be swept off our feet or we can be rooted to the ground. Our friendships take us on amazing explorations and lift us to new heights and keep us focused on the more basic and important values we cherish. The ability to control fire is one of the major developments in the cultural history of man. Fire serves not only as a source of heat, but also of light and protection. Special vessels were constructed out of pottery to hold and cherish this source. Our collection of pottery candles shares both the warmth of the fire through friendship circles and hope for peace.

Price: $20.00

Neker Glass Candle Holders Green (set of 2)

Glass has been known to man for at least 3500 years. First made in Egypt, and then in Syria, glass vessels produced in a variety of ways were extremely popular throughout the Roman world. Syria was an important production center making high quality decorative glass and exporting it to the rest of the Roman Empire.  The Neker glass holders  will make any occasions special.

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Glass captured the imagination of artisans in ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, who used it to fashion minute objects such as pendants, beads and inlays. In the mid-second millennium BCE, small glass containers were first produced as luxury items for the royal courts. These vessels were made in the core-forming technique in a variety of hues – principally deep blue, turquoise, yellow and white – which emulated semi-precious metals. Over the centuries various casting methods, as well as mosaic-glass and gold-glass techniques, were employed. As the demand for glass vessels increased, sophisticated production methods evolved and new forms were introduced. During the 1st Century glass came into daily use with a large variety of different wares being made. The characteristic transparency, delicacy, and subtle colors, as well as many of the forms – wineglasses, bottles, juglets and jars – that were introduced in the Roman period are still the trademarks of glassware today. Many of the vessels in this collection would have been used in a Roman citizen’s daily life as containers for oils, scents, foodstuffs and perfumed waters. The pieces are hand blown in Jerusalem, Israel by the Neker brothers. They have been blowing glass since 1959.

Price: $45.00

Neker Glass Candle Holders Olive (set of 2)

Glass has been known to man for at least 3500 years. First made in Egypt, and then in Syria, glass vessels produced in a variety of ways were extremely popular throughout the Roman world. Syria was an important production center making high quality decorative glass and exporting it to the rest of the Roman Empire.  The Neker glass holders  will make any  occasions special.H

| READ MORE |
Additional DescriptionMore Details

Glass captured the imagination of artisans in ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, who used it to fashion minute objects such as pendants, beads and inlays. In the mid-second millennium BCE, small glass containers were first produced as luxury items for the royal courts. These vessels were made in the core-forming technique in a variety of hues – principally deep blue, turquoise, yellow and white – which emulated semi-precious metals. Over the centuries various casting methods, as well as mosaic-glass and gold-glass techniques, were employed. As the demand for glass vessels increased, sophisticated production methods evolved and new forms were introduced. During the 1st Century glass came into daily use with a large variety of different wares being made. The characteristic transparency, delicacy, and subtle colors, as well as many of the forms – wineglasses, bottles, juglets and jars – that were introduced in the Roman period are still the trademarks of glassware today. Many of the vessels in this collection would have been used in a Roman citizen’s daily life as containers for oils, scents, foodstuffs and perfumed waters. The pieces are hand blown in Jerusalem, Israel by the Neker brothers. They have been blowing glass since 1959.

Price: $45.00

Neker Glass Candle Holders Red (set of 2)

Glass has been known to man for at least 3500 years. First made in Egypt, and then in Syria, glass vessels produced in a variety of ways were extremely popular throughout the Roman world. Syria was an important production center making high quality decorative glass and exporting it to the rest of the Roman Empire.  The Neker glass holders  will make any  occasions special.H

| READ MORE |
Additional DescriptionMore Details

Glass captured the imagination of artisans in ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, who used it to fashion minute objects such as pendants, beads and inlays. In the mid-second millennium BCE, small glass containers were first produced as luxury items for the royal courts. These vessels were made in the core-forming technique in a variety of hues – principally deep blue, turquoise, yellow and white – which emulated semi-precious metals. Over the centuries various casting methods, as well as mosaic-glass and gold-glass techniques, were employed. As the demand for glass vessels increased, sophisticated production methods evolved and new forms were introduced. During the 1st Century glass came into daily use with a large variety of different wares being made. The characteristic transparency, delicacy, and subtle colors, as well as many of the forms – wineglasses, bottles, juglets and jars – that were introduced in the Roman period are still the trademarks of glassware today. Many of the vessels in this collection would have been used in a Roman citizen’s daily life as containers for oils, scents, foodstuffs and perfumed waters. The pieces are hand blown in Jerusalem, Israel by the Neker brothers. They have been blowing glass since 1959.

Price: $45.00

Passover – Silk tie

“Offer the Passover sacrifice at its set time; you shall offer it on the fourteenth day in accordance with all its rules and rites”. (Numbers 9:3)

There are many symbolic items needed to remind us of the story of the Exodus. The mosaic blend of these ritual symbols help form the Seder (order). By having the items we have a constant reminder of the freedom we enjoy and remember the bondage long ago.

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Passover is celebrated for 8 days and always begins on the 15th day of the Hebrew month of Nisan.Passover celebrates the Jewish people’s freedom from Egyptian bondage that took place over 3,000 years ago, as told in the Book of Exodus. Under the reign of Pharaoh Rameses II, the leader Moses led his people out of Egypt after a series of 10 plagues that Moses warned the Pharaoh would devastate his people, if he refused to let them go. After each plague, the Pharaoh agreed to let the Hebrews go, but the Pharaoh soon changed his mind and continued to hold the Hebrews as slaves. Finally, after the 10th plague, the Pharoah let the Hebrews go for good. However, after the Hebrews left in a hurry, in fact so quickly that they did not have time to bake any bread for the trip to Canaan, and instead baked unleavened bread, called Matzah. The Pharaoh changed his mind and sent his army into the Sinai desert after the Hebrews. When they saw the Egyptian army fast approaching toward them, they called out in despair to Moses. Fortunately, g-d intervened and commanded Moses to strike his staff on the waters of the Red Sea. G-d then commanded Moses to strike the waters of the Red Sea again, just as the Egyptian army followed them through the parted Red Sea. The waters came together again, drowning the entire Egyptian army and the Hebrews were saved Since the time of Jewish freedom from Egyptian slavery, Jews have celebrated this historical event by having a feast called the ‘Seder’. The word ‘Seder’ means ‘order’ and refers to the order of historical events recalled in the Passover meal. The story of Passover is read from a book called the ‘Haggadah’. While the main story of Passover is read by Jews the world over, local customs and traditions have changed over time, so that the festival has been adapted to reflect the life and routine of individual communities. Passover celebrates this history. The first 2 nights of the 8 day holiday are celebrated with lavish meals in which the stories and history of Passover are celebrated. Passover is a celebration of Freedom. This holiday helps to remind us of the freedom we must protect and cherish. We are taught as well that people can and have been stripped of their right for freedom. Passover helps remind us to help ensure freedom for all of G-ds creation.

Price: $36.00

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