Qumran and The Dead Sea Scrolls

The Dead Sea Scrolls: The origins of the Qumran communities are believed to be of Essenes, the pious anti-Hellenistic circles formed in the early days of the Maccabees. who were concerned about growing Hellenization and strove to abide by the Torah. Archeological and historical evidence indicates that Qumran abandoned about the time of the Roman incursion of 68 C.E., two years before the collapse of Jewish self-government in Judea and the destruction of the Temple in Jerusalem in 70 C

Qumran and The Dead Sea Scrolls Silk Tie

The origins of the Qumran communities are believed to be of Essenes, the pious anti-Hellenistic circles formed in the early days of the Maccabees. The tie feature parts of the scrolls found in Qumran with other vessels found at the excavations.
In 1947, a Bedouin shepherd boy accidentally stumbled upon one of the century's greatest finds in a dark cave in the Judean desert. He sold three of the seven scrolls to an antiquities dealer in Bethlehem, who in turn sold them to the archaeologist Prof Sukenik of the Hebrew University.

Over the years, thousands more fragments of parchment, some papyrus and some leather, were found and pieced together into 80 documents. Since 1965, the scrolls have been on display at the Israel Museum in the Shrine of the Book. The pieces of parchment were well-preserved by the dry desert climate of the region. The Dead Sea Scrolls represent a turning point in Jewish history. They reveal the link between Biblical Israel and the Jewish culture of the Talmudic period. They are the oldest known copy of the Old Testament. Scholar’s opinion regarding the time span and background of the Dead Sea Scrolls is anchored in historical, paleographic, and linguistic evidence, corroborated firmly by carbon 14-datings. Some manuscripts were written and copied in the third century B.C.E., but the bulk of the material, particularly the texts that reflect on a sectarian community, are originals or copies from the first century B.C.E.; a number of texts date from as late as the years preceding the destruction of the site in 68 C.E. at the hands of the Roman legions. The origins of the Qumran communities are believed to be of Essenes, the pious anti-Hellenistic circles formed in the early days of the Maccabees. who were concerned about growing Hellenization and strove to abide by the Torah. Archeological and historical evidence indicates that Qumran abandoned about the time of the Roman incursion of 68 C.E., two years before the collapse of Jewish self-government in Judea and the destruction of the Temple in Jerusalem in 70 C.E. The Essenes persisted in a separatist existence through two centuries, occupying themselves with study and a communal way of life that included worship, prayer, and work. Many of the non-Old Testament scrolls contain details about the Essene sect and their values. One of the scrolls tells the story of the battle between the "sons of light and the sons of darkness" and echoes the struggle between good and evil. The Essenes included celibate men, a phenomenon rarely found in Judaism, and their influence on the early Christians is unquestionable, making the scrolls of immense interest to Christian, as well as Jewish scholars. Undoubtedly these ancient manuscripts will remain a witness to Jewish continuity and a source of knowledge regarding the roots of Christianity for centuries to come.

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