Scarves

scarf-model1Scarves are no longer simply a square or long narrow strip of material worn for warmth round the neck or tied round the head.   Covering the head had religious connotations among the Hindus, Jews, Christians, Parsis and Muslims. For many years Indian sari-pallav or the dupatta or odhani has served this purpose. But scarves have left behind the peasant-inspired look and have crashed onto the beaches, in colleges, evening out, day-time casual wear and the fashion magazines. They are in vogue and, along with bags, shoes, belts and jewelry, have become the accessories of the moment.

Our designs have a blend of contemporary elements with the feel of the ancient designs of mosaic calendar inspired by an unearthed floor or the mystique of the scrolls found in the Judean wilderness relating untold tales.

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King Tutankhamun Falcon Feather and Golden Band Scarf

Scarves are no longer simply a square or long narrow strip of material worn for warmth round the neck or tied round the head. Covering the head had religious connotations among the Hindus, Jews, Christians, Parsis and Muslims. For many years Indian sari-pallav or the dupatta or odhani has served this purpose.

 

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But scarves have left behind the peasant-inspired look and have crashed onto the beaches, in colleges, evening out, day-time casual wear and the fashion magazines. They are in vogue and, along with bags, shoes, belts and jewelry, have become the accessories of the moment. Our designs have a blend of contemporary elements with the feel of the ancient designs relating untold tales. This design is taken from the Golden Bands that were around King Tut Mummy. The bands were made of beaten gold plaques which were inscribed with religious texts. The cartouche reads: Tutankhamon, Ruler of Heliopolis tut-ankh-amun heka iunu. Under the kings hands on the coffin the goddesses Nekhbet and Wadjet, spread their wings protectively around the upper part of the royal body. Each of them grasp in their talons the hieroglyphic sign for "infinity”. Under the kings hands on the coffin the goddesses Nekhbet and Wadjet, spread their wings protectively around the upper part of the royal body. Osiris were routinely added to the decoration of the coffin walls in order to provide a ring of protection around the king. Egypt is our window to humanity's distant past and in understanding its history, we find mankind's greatest glories and achievements, as well as his often repeated mistakes. We may follow along with the building of empires, only to see them collapse again and again. We find great men and rulers of renowned, but we often also see their ultimate demise. We learn about religion, its evolution and, as the world grows older, its replacement with newer religions. Yet, the ancient Egyptian religion has never really completely died out. Even today, many Egyptians continue customs, including some aspects of religion, held over from thousands of years ago. In fact, throughout the world, aspects of the ancient Egyptian religion, particularly funerary, continue to make an impact on our modern lives. The designs of the neckwear are based on elements found on the coffins of king Tutankhamen. There is probably no more famous group of artifacts in the world then those associated with the discovery of young King Tutankhamen's tomb. Tutankhamen died as young as 16 or 17 years of age. He was probably a son of King Akhenaton by one of his secondary wives. His wife Ankhesenamun was daughter of Akhenaton and Nefertiti. Tutankhamen came to the throne as a young child and ruled for about nine years under the regency of Vizier Ay and the strong influence of the army commander Horemheb. The main events of his reign were to move the capital of Egypt back from El-Amarna to Memphis and to begin the transition from the monotheistic cult of Aton created by Akhenaton back to the polytheistic religion of Egypt with Amun-Ra again as the main God.

Price: $45.00

Qumran and The Dead Sea Scrolls Scarf

Scarves are no longer simply a square or long narrow strip of material worn for warmth round the neck or tied round the head. Covering the head had religious connotations among the Hindus, Jews, Christians, Parsis and Muslims. For many years Indian sari-pallav or the dupatta or odhani has served this purpose. But scarves have left behind the peasant-inspired look and have crashed onto the beaches, in colleges, evening out, day-time casual wear and the fashion magazines. They are in vogue and, along with bags, shoes, belts and jewelry, have become the accessories of the moment.

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Our designs have a blend of contemporary elements with the feel of the ancient designs inspired by the mystique of the scrolls found in the Judean wilderness relating untold tales. The origins of the Qumran communities are believed to be of Essenes, the pious anti-Hellenistic circles formed in the early days of the Maccabees. The tie feature parts of the scrolls found in Qumran with other vessels found at the excavations. In 1947, a Bedouin shepherd boy accidentally stumbled upon one of the century's greatest finds in a dark cave in the Judean desert. He sold three of the seven scrolls to an antiquities dealer in Bethlehem, who in turn sold them to the archaeologist Prof Sukenik of the Hebrew University. Over the years, thousands more fragments of parchment, some papyrus and some leather, were found and pieced together into 80 documents. Since 1965, the scrolls have been on display at the Israel Museum in the Shrine of the Book. The pieces of parchment were well-preserved by the dry desert climate of the region. The Dead Sea Scrolls represent a turning point in Jewish history. They reveal the link between Biblical Israel and the Jewish culture of the Talmudic period. They are the oldest known copy of the Old Testament. Scholar’s opinion regarding the time span and background of the Dead Sea Scrolls is anchored in historical, paleographic, and linguistic evidence, corroborated firmly by carbon 14-datings. Some manuscripts were written and copied in the third century B.C.E., but the bulk of the material, particularly the texts that reflect on a sectarian community, are originals or copies from the first century B.C.E.; a number of texts date from as late as the years preceding the destruction of the site in 68 C.E. at the hands of the Roman legions. The origins of the Qumran communities are believed to be of Essenes, the pious anti-Hellenistic circles formed in the early days of the Maccabees. who were concerned about growing Hellenization and strove to abide by the Torah. Archeological and historical evidence indicates that Qumran abandoned about the time of the Roman incursion of 68 C.E., two years before the collapse of Jewish self-government in Judea and the destruction of the Temple in Jerusalem in 70 C.E. The Essenes persisted in a separatist existence through two centuries, occupying themselves with study and a communal way of life that included worship, prayer, and work. Many of the non-Old Testament scrolls contain details about the Essene sect and their values. One of the scrolls tells the story of the battle between the "sons of light and the sons of darkness" and echoes the struggle between good and evil. The Essenes included celibate men, a phenomenon rarely found in Judaism, and their influence on the early Christians is unquestionable, making the scrolls of immense interest to Christian, as well as Jewish scholars. Undoubtedly these ancient manuscripts will remain a witness to Jewish continuity and a source of knowledge regarding the roots of Christianity for centuries to come.

Price: $45.00

The Zodiac Silk Scarf

Throughout history people have shown an interest in the stars. The zodiac signs can be traced to Babylonian days. The ancient synagogue of Beit Alpha had in its center a marvelous mosaic floor with the 12 signs. The floor features the Hebrew names of the zodiac with the names of the Hebrew months. It is referred to as the Zodiac wheel and in Hebrew as galgal mazalot.

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Mazal is the sign. Many leading authorities have discussed in various writings such as the Talmud, whether the practice of astrology was prohibited by the Jewish law. The fact remains that in each occasion which calls for celebration, you can hear everyone call out in Hebrew "MAZAL TOV"! (be it in a good sign). This 36x36 hand silk screen scarf design is influenced by the floor from the Byzantine period Beit Alpha Synagogue in Israel. Each mazal is featured with the specific colors associated with it. The name of the mazal appears in English and Hebrew. Each Hebrew month appears in the corresponding mazal. A tree progressing through the four seasons shows the constant flow of life.

Price: $45.00